Archive for the ‘high school television’ category

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 03/28/08

March 30, 2008

Verizon CEO seeks pact on a state cable license
by Jay Fitzgerald
Boston Herald (MA)
03/28/08

[ comments invited ]

Verizon’s Ivan Seidenberg wants to cut a broadband deal with Massachusetts – and Mayor Thomas Menino signaled yesterday he’s willing to listen to his offers. The giant telecom’s chief executive, who spoke at yesterday’s Boston College Chief Executives’ Club of Boston lunch, said Verizon is willing to wire rural and other remote areas of the state if lawmakers give the company a “statewide license” to deploy its broadband cable and Internet service without negotiating with individual towns. —>
http://www.bostonherald.com/business/general/view.bg?articleid=1083342
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AT&T, EBR approve TV deal
Action adds new competitor
by Ben Calder
Advocate (LA)
03/28/08

AT&T and the city-parish have reached an agreement to allow the company to offer television service in East Baton Rouge Parish, adding another competitor to a market that includes cable provider Cox Communications and satellite services Dish Network and Direct TV. The agreement, ratified by a unanimous vote by the Metro Council Wednesday night, will allow the company to begin providing Internet-based television programming along with its Internet and phone service through fiber or copper lines using a set-top box.

But AT&T spokeswoman Karen Beck said the company will not say when people can begin using the service, called AT&T U-verse, already offered in 12 states. The city-parish will get 5 percent of AT&T’s gross revenue from subscription fees and 0.5 percent of gross revenue to support the capital costs incurred for the construction and operation of the city-parish’s public, educational and governmental channels.

The mayor’s office did not return a call for comment Thursday. The council approved the deal without comment the evening before. The agreement, which Beck said has been in the works for about six months, is the first between a Louisiana municipality and AT&T. Beck said while AT&T plans to pursue similar agreements with New Orleans and other cities with a home rule charter predating 1974, its next step will be to try to get a statewide franchise.

AT&T did so two years ago, but then-Gov. Kathleen Blanco vetoed the bill. The company said House Bill No. 1009 and Senate Bill No. 422 were filed late last week and will enable AT&T to obtain a statewide franchise. Beck said she did not know whether Gov. Bobby Jindal would be more receptive to the bill if it passes again. —>
http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/17077326.html
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“AT&T, EBR approve TV deal”
by John St. Julien
Lafayette Pro Fiber (LA)
03/28/08

[ 2 comments ]

Well, that was fast! The day before yesterday we noted here that AT&T through its astroturf subsidary TV4US had launched the public relations champaign to support its statewide video franchise law. This morning we see the first substantial political move in the upcoming battle. Baton Rouge has cut a deal with AT&T and so is taken off the board in an early first move of the chess pieces.

AT&T, according to the Advocate, has reached a franchise agreement with the East Baton Rouge City-Parish government to provide cable TV (aka “video services”) in the parish. Follows a summary of what seems to be going on with the caveat that all I have to go on is the article…I can’t find the ordinance or contract online as I would be able to in Lafayette—anyone have access?

AT&T will have the right to offer its new “U-verse” services (site, overview) in the parish for 5 percent of revenues to the general fund and .5% of revenues to support public, educational, and governmental channels (PEG channels). Presuming that turns out to be correct (and enforceable) its a good deal on two of the three major issues that any locale should consider: a fair price for the rental of public land and support for local media. Realizing any actual benefit from those two will depend on the third leg: the product being offered to a sizeable number of citizens.

AT&T has long made it clear that they do not intend to offer this product to just anyone…instead they want to offer it chiefly to their “high value” customers and less than 5% of their “low-value” purchasers. (Fiber To The Rich, FTTR) If you figure out the implications of what they told investors back when this plan got underway they only intend to offer this product to about half of their current population base. Baton Rouge and other wealthy centers in generally cash-poor Louisiana might get U-Verse in rich neighborhoods but I’d be surprised if it went much into North Baton Rouge and Scotlandville. That might prove a difficult thing for Mayor Kip Holden to explain.

A bit of unease about the part AT&T was unwilling to promise might well, in turn, explain the secrecy with which this deal was constructed and the stealth with which it was executed. Holden received the council’s blessing to negotiate on Wednesday with no (that’s NO) discussion, and was able close and announce the deal on Thursday. The fix was in. (*) What didn’t happen was any public discussion of the pros and cons of the deal offered by AT&T–discussion which might well have lead to uncomfortable demands that the city-parish require AT&T to actually serve the citizens whose property AT&T wants to use. Such a requirement is part of Cox’s deal…but not, I have to strongly suspect, part of the deal with AT&T. —>

And, speaking of Cox, what about the cable companies? Where do they play in this game? A smart reporter will try and delve into that question. AT&T is using its extraordinary influence in the legislature to push two very bad video bills through the legislature. By comparison the cable companies have relatively little influence. What’s curious is that Lafayette is the state’s largest community to whom these bills will apply. Should Lafayette succeed, as she did two years ago, in getting herself excluded along with other older home rule communities the five largest metro areas of the state comprising the wealthiest 35-40% of the state’s population will have to have local franchises anyway. Since no one (except deliberately naive legislators) actually believes that AT&T is going to provide video in rural regions the question has to be who will really benefit?

One devious answer would have to be: the cable companies. They will be able to drop their local franchises with the communities that actually own the land they want to use, pick up a state franchise at a 30% discount in fees and NO local obligation to serve PEG channels. In other states like North Carolina where the phone company waged a bitter war to win the right to a state video franchise they didn’t make use of it and filed few such requests. On the other hand their supposed cable opponents made out like bandits snatching up state franchises which allowed them to drop the more demanding local ones. The end result was no significant new competition, no price drops, and a huge drop in income to local municipalities.

Somebody in North Carolina got taken…..and the grifters are on the prowl here

(*)Revealing tidbit: The wikipedia section on U-Verse vailability was updated to include Baton Rouge on the 25th, two days before Baton Rouge supposedly concluded the deal and one day before the city-parish council approved negotiations. Not surprisingly, the prescient anonymous editor who added Baton Rouge to the list of cities was operating from a “BellSouth” (now AT&T) URL. The fix was in….
http://lafayetteprofiber.com/Blog/2008/03/at-ebr-approve-tv-deal.html
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Metro Live Television Chat Far More Informative Than Metro Live Online Chat
by Fred Camino
MetroRider LA (CA)
03/28/08

[ 11 comments ]

Last night, Metro Board member Pam O’Connor answered questions and spoke about the Long Range Transit Plan on Los Angeles Public Access Television. I’ll be honest, I didn’t watch the live show last night, but watched it on the web this morning. You can check out the show on LA36’s website, right here.

The hour long show proved to be a much better medium for Pam than her monthly home on the Metro Interactive online chat, which is pretty much universally panned for its inability to be either interactive or informative. Metro Live, despite its obviously public access level production values, managed to keep my attention for the entire hour. Pam’s answers came off a lot more candid and sincere than they do on the online chat, which for the most part seem like copy-paste clippings from Metro press releases. That’s not to say she didn’t paint a rosy picture of Metro when faced with some hardballs, from hearing her talk you’d think the TAP card is the second coming and fare gates are neccessary, well, just because. Here’s some highlights (and lowlights). —>
http://metroriderla.com/2008/03/28/metro-live-television-chat-far-more-informative-than-metro-live-online-chat/
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March Madness: Bruins, O’Connor Both Win During TV Showdown
by Damien Newton
Streetsblog Los Angeles (CA)
03/28/08

[ 1 comment ]

LA Streetsblog picks up the action as UCLA holds a 28-15 lead over the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers in their Sweet Sixteen match up in the NCAA Tournament. UCLA is wearing their home whites despite being miles from Westwood. The game is being broadcast nationally at CBS.

Meanwhile, Metro Board Chair Pam O’Connor was wearing her road pinks at her home court at Santa Monica City Hall for a call-in-show about Metro’s Long Range Transportation Plan. Metro Live! was broadcast on LA City Cable Channel 36 and Santa Monica Channel 16. Just like UCLA ended up winning after some shaky moments, O’Connor gave a strong performance despite perhaps over focusing on the benefits of TAP cards. We pick up the action, after the jump. —>
http://la.streetsblog.org/2008/03/28/march-madness-bruins-o%e2%80%99connor-both-win-during-tv-showdown/
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Singer in tune with message
by Kerri Roche
Daily News Tribune (MA)
03/28/08

[ 2 comments ]

Unlike many celebrities and stars, Renee Marcou is not waiting for fame to envelop her before she gets puts her name next to an important cause. While she puts together her second album, Marcou, 19, also serves as the spokeswoman for the Baby Safe Haven New England Foundation. Yesterday morning, she belted out her latest tunes for a student-produced segment on Waltham Education Television, combining her passion for pop, rhythm and blues with a less than Hollywood-glamour conversation about abandoned babies…

A Wilmington native, Marcou, who has family, including Councilor at-large David Marcou, living in Waltham, has performed at Gillette Stadium and in Los Angeles and Chicago. When she’s not performing, she is a guest on radio and television shows throughout New England, promoting her songs and the options for reluctant parents.

Although WE-TV won’t get the audiences of NECN, where Marcou has previously appeared, Morrisey said local cable television and radio shows generate attention from their target audience – young adults. “You would think a high school TV station wouldn’t be important, but actually we found … they’re probably the most important media outlets to get the message out to. That’s what kids listen to,” said Morrisey. “She’s done every genre of radio of format from punk rock to sports talk.”

Waltham students invited Marcou to their half-hour magazine-style news show because of her vocal and dancing talents, said Patrick Daly, high school television production teacher. Although the student interviewers P.J. Centofanti and Jen Gullotti will likely focus on her career path, the conversation will undoubtedly shift toward Marcou’s more serious work, said Daly. “That’s the cause that she promotes, so we’ll talk about that as well,” said Daly, who added that the segment will air in a few weeks. —>
http://www.dailynewstribune.com/news/x334360812
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One Class
by Will Okun
New York Times
03/27/08

[ 185 comments ]

The average Chicago Public School freshman misses 20 school days a year and fails more than two semester classes. At my high school on the Westside of Chicago, attendance trumps intelligence, work ethic and economic background as the most important indicator of achievement versus failure. In this case, Woody Allen is correct: “Eighty percent of success is showing up.”

In most communities, students attend school every day because they are convinced that educational achievement is essential to their future success. For many unfortunate reasons, however, this expectation does not exist for most low-income students in Chicago and other urban areas. How do we improve attendance at low-income schools where the current incentive of “a better future” is not sufficient?

According to high school junior Mark Hill, “One special class can make the difference. I know people who come to school just because they are involved in a sport or a certain extracurricular program or they have one great class that they are interested in.”

When rap superstar Kanye West explained the purpose of his education foundation, he stressed that music production classes could inspire “at-risk” kids to attend and remain in school in the same manner as athletics often do. “We have to involve kids in their education,” he told the reporters. “Kids will go to school if they have the opportunity to study something they love. Right now, they are not motivated by the curriculum.”

In my own nine years of teaching, students enrolled in my photography class boast a 90% daily attendance rate while students enrolled in my English classes maintain a daily attendance rate of only 70%. However, an even better example of the positive effect of a single class is Jeff McCarter’s Free Spirit Media video production program at North Lawndale College Prep.

McCarter’s students produce the insanely popular television show “Hoops High,” which features play-by-play game coverage of Chicago high school athletic events. The students are responsible for all aspects of production: they shoot, edit, and announce all of the action themselves. The students even conduct sideline interviews. “Everything you see is us — we’re doing it all,” brags freshman Daryl Jackson. “Most kids’ programs are run by adults where they control the final project, but here we are in charge.”

The final product is telecast every Saturday night on public access T.V. (CAN-TV) and is one of the station’s most popular shows with over 70,000 regular viewers. Students and faculty at my own school regularly watch the telecast. “First of all, they shoot all the best games, they know which games we want to see. But also, the announcers know what’s going on in the schools so you get all these side stories about the players and the fans,” explains student Lazzerick Allen. —>
http://kristof.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/03/27/one-class/
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Media Re:public Forum Panel on Participatory Media: Defining Success, Measuring Impact
by Victoria Stodden
Victoria Stodden
03/28/08

[ comments invited ]

Margaret Duffy is a Professor from the University of Missouri School of Journalism and she is speaking at Berkman’s Media Re:public Forum. She leads a Citizen Media Participation project to create a taxonomy of news categories and get a sense of the state of citizen media via sampling news across the nation. They are interested in where the funding in coming from, the amount of citizen participation, and getting an idea of what the content is. They are also creating a social network called NewNewsMedia.org connecting seekers and posters to bring together people interested in the same sorts of things…

Duffy is followed by Carol Darr, director of the Institute for Politics, Democracy and the Internet (ipdi) at George Washington University. She is discussing the “Media Habits of Poli-fluentials” and building on work from the book, “The Influentials” by Ed Keller and Jon Berry. The idea is that one person in ten tells the other nine how to votes, where to eat, etc. The interesting thing Darr notes is that poli-fluentials (her term) are not elites in the traditional sense but local community leaders and ordinary folk who appear to be knowledgable to their peers. She notes that people who seem to know a lot of people tend to be these poli-fluentials. —>
http://blog.stodden.net/2008/03/28/media-republic-panel-defining-success-measuring-impact-of-participatory-media/
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Media Re:Public, part 7
by Nathaniel James
Phase Transitions
03/28/08

[ comments invited ]

Media Re:public is hosting this back channel. I got into this conversation with Sasha Costanza-Chock.

Nathan: For Ron C: how can cable access centers reach out to, connect, and collaborate with the world of new media and user generated content? There’s a tradition there that needs to connect!
schock: Check out Manhattan Neighborhood Network, and Denver Open Access. They are great examples of public access connecting to new media.
Nathan: Absolutely! But why are MNN, etc the exception? How can we port those models to PEG/access more universally?
schock: Well there’s one thing the funders might think about 🙂 Support extending those models around the country.
http://phasetransitions.blogspot.com/2008/03/media-republic-part-7.html
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Comcast admits it can do the impossible
‘We will stop busting BitTorrents’
by Cade Metz
The Register (UK)
03/28/08

[ 16 commemnts ]

Faced with continued scrutiny from the US Federal Communications Commission, Comcast has agreed to release its choke hold on BitTorrent and other peer-to-peer traffic. It says it will soon adopt an alternative method of controlling upload traffic on its cable-based internet service. This also means that Comcast has acknowledged there’s an alternative method of controlling upload traffic on its cable-based internet service.

Today, with an early morning press release, the big-name American ISP and cable television provider said it would switch to “a capacity management technique that is protocol agnostic” by the end of the year. “We will have to rapidly reconfigure our network management systems, but the outcome will be a traffic management technique that is more appropriate for today’s emerging Internet trends,” Comcast Cable CTO Tony Werner said in a canned statement. “We have been discussing this migration and its effects with leaders in the Internet community for the last several months, and we will refine, adjust, and publish the technique based upon feedback and initial trial results.” Werner did not point out that Comcast also spent the last several months publicly defending its right to bust BitTorrents. —>
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03/28/comcast_to_stop_busting_bittorrents/
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Liberating the Electromagnetic Commons
by Andrew Back
carrierdetect.com (UK)
03/28/08

[ comments invited ]

I’ve always been fascinated with radio and it’s many applications: from Rugby’s MSF time signal and long-wave broadcast radio, through HF amateur radio and VHF PMR, to television, wireless networks and satellite navigation systems. Yes, I’m a radio geek.

So it should be of no surprise that I take a keen interest in how our incredibly scarce resource – the electromagnetic spectrum – is managed. And let’s be clear it is our resource as it truly belongs to the people and is not the product of the labours of an organisation or state, despite what some would rather have us believe. But since it is a finite resource and one of such value there is no avoiding the fact that it must be carefully managed. And this comes down at a top level to government agencies such as the FCC in the USA and Ofcom in the UK.

Up until now such agencies have largely done a good job of managing this resource and ensuring that spectrum is shared fairly and amongst a diverse range of users with varying needs. Of course for this thankless task they have not gone short of a bob or two, as has been demonstrated most visibly via the auctions for spectrum required for operating a 3G mobile service in the UK, which raised in excess of £22billion. —>
http://carrierdetect.com/?p=103
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compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web: http://ourchannels.org
wiki: http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 03/01/08

March 8, 2008

Astroturfs, Now Fighting for Cable
Side Cut Reports
03/01/08

[ comments allowed ]

Is there such a shortage of news around telecom public policy that normally respectable information outlets still fall so easily for astroturf announcements? If you are a Comcast lobbyist you just have to love the official sound of the lead graf in this non-news missive from IDG “news” service, which asserts that “a coalition of seven civil rights groups” is now banding together to fight off the resurrection of network neutrality, mainly in reference to the recent FCC hearing about Comcast’s network management practices.

C’mon. Please. Does anyone really believe anymore that the National Black Chamber of Commerce, Latinos in Information Sciences and Technology Association, League of Rural Voters, and National Council of Women’s Organizations just happen to have the same viewpoints on net neutrality and cable network management? Or maybe, they are all BFF and on Facebook together, and said “hey, we really need to work together to ensure our voices are heard.”

Right.  Or maybe, they are all organizations that get substantial contributions from large telecommunication companies or cable providers, whose legislative agendas just happen to mesh with those of the civil rights groups. (Or maybe they all just use the same policy PR firm, whose prinicpals have been at this a long time.)

C’mon, InfoWorld. C’mon, Mike. Do some digging before you post — the scoop on these outfits is already out there thanks to the fine work of Bruce Kushnick and many others.   —>
http://sidecutreports.com/2008/03/01/astroturfs-now-fighting-for-cable/
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Lawsuit holds back digital cable switch
Public access channel still widely available
by Nicholas Deshais
Times Herald (MI)
03/01/08

[ comments allowed ]

Comcast announced a slate of programming changes Friday, including the removal of some channels from standard cable in order to move them to a high-definition format.  As part of the changes, effective March 27, Channel 900, the simulcast of public access standard-definition Channel 12, has been moved to Channel 901, which carries a digital signal. The announcement says programming available on Channel 12 will remain there but does not indicate if that could change after a lawsuit regarding moving public, educational and government channels is resolved.   —>
http://www.thetimesherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080301/NEWS01/803010308/1002
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Lights, camera, school board
by Stephen Sacco
Times Herald-Record (NY)
03/01/08

The Port Jervis School District now has its own educational public-access television station — Time Warner Cable Channel 20 in the Port Jervis viewing area. The channel was launched Feb. 8 and features live coverage of Port Jervis school board meetings.   —>
http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080301/NEWS/803010323
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Board of Supervisors meetings airing on TV
Residents may now view county Board of Supervisors’ meetings on the city’s public channel, City TV.
SignOnSanDiego.com (CA)
03/01/08

[ comments allowed ]

The meetings take place on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, but will be aired in their entirety each Friday morning. The stations, Channel 24 on Cox and Time Warner cable and Channel 99 on AT&T, also air City Council and committee meetings, news conferences by city officials and some county programming.  Until now, television broadcasts of supervisors meetings were available only through the County Television Network, which does not appear on Cox. –J.V.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20080301-9999-1m1b2briefs.html
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City near long-delayed cable deal
by Amelia Flood
Kane County Chronicle (IL)
03/01/08

[ comments allowed ]

ST. CHARLES – A seven-year stalemate over a franchise agreement between St. Charles and its cable provider, Comcast, soon might be over, but it will have little impact on customers.  The new contract still must be approved by the City Council.  The city will continue to collect a 5 percent franchise fee from Comcast. That comes to about $375,000 a year.  In the future, residents could see a 35-cent monthly charge added to their bills. The money would go toward increasing public access programming. The city has no plans to implement the fee at this time, City Administrator Brian Townsend said, and it would require additional council action.   —>
http://www.kcchronicle.com/articles/2008/03/01/news/local/doc47c9330c412b2835593590.txt
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Goodies up for bid to assist GHS-TV
Student-run public-access station sets $40,000 goal
by Lela Garlington
Commercial Appeal (TN)
03/01/08

[ comments allowed ]

Interested in a five-day hotel stay in Orlando? Or getting your closet reorganized? How about VIP passes to the Stanford St. Jude Golf Championship?  This weekend, the award-winning Germantown Community Television hosts its 15th annual auction from 2 to 9 p.m. today and again from 1 to 6 p.m. Sunday.

Germantown residents can watch the auction on Channel 17. Viewers outside of Germantown can see a portion of Auction 2008 on Comcast Cable Channel 30 from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday. DirectTV viewers will not be able to see the cablecast, but anyone can bid online at ghstv.org.

“Last year we raised about $35,000 and this year we hope to make $40,000 or more,” said publicity co-chairwoman and student Johnnalee Kutzke. “The money from the auction will benefit the television studio and also contribute to our senior scholarships awarded at the end of the year.”   —>
http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2008/mar/01/goodies-up-for-bid-to-assist-ghs-tv/
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Community Organization with Digital Tools
by Dan Schultz
MediaShift Idea Lab
03/01/08

[ 4 comments ]

Last week I took a digital-communication-oriented glance at the war on Scientology being led by the nontraditional online group called Anonymous. I’m not exactly writing a part 2, but I want to start a follow-up discussion on a few of the comments made and questions posed by Anonymous about how digital media affects the dynamics of community organization. That being said, if you haven’t had the chance to browse the comments of that post it’s probably worthwhile.

I have mentioned in the past that I want to see digital media facilitate local impact; to do that well we need to understand some of the nuances of many-to-many digital communication and look at how those nuances might change the way communities can plan, organize, and ultimately act on the issues they find important. This post lists a few traits of online communication and what they might mean for digitally driven movements, including the one being led by Anonymous.   —>
http://www.pbs.org/idealab/2008/03/community-organization-with-di.html
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Cable’s Class Act
CIC Boosts Its Profile as Education Leader
by Stuart Miller
Multichannel News
03/03/08

[ comments allowed ]

After nearly two decades, the Cable in the Classroom educational foundation continues to work closely with networks and operators to provide cable technology and programming to schools and libraries nationwide…

People often thought there was a catch to CIC, said Donna Krache, executive producer of CNN Student News. “They’d look at you sideways and just not believe that it was free.”  Overall, CIC was welcomed with open arms: Peggy Charren, the outspoken president of the advocacy group Action for Children’s Television, said at the time, “I’ve got problems with everything when it comes to children and television. I have no problems with this.”…

CIC is placing a growing emphasis on broadband access to provide schools with study guides, clips and even games. “Teachers are very busy and don’t have time to slog through material,” O’Connell said. “This is something that really works and it’s a good, reliable resource.”

Among CIC’s latest initiatives is eLECTIONS, which offers video from C-SPAN, CNN Student News and The History Channel to teach about the election process and lets students run their own campaigns in a multiplatform game. “The depth of resources with something like this is so great you almost don’t need the textbook,” said Krache.   —>
http://www.multichannel.com/article/CA6537156.html
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Russia: NTV’s Past Points Toward REN-TV’s Future
by Robert Coalson
Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
03/01/08

When independent experts this week released their assessment of media coverage of the Russian presidential election, there were few surprises. On Channel One, First Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev got 32 percent of election-related airtime; on Rossia, he got 26 percent; on TV-Tsentr, he got 35 percent; and on NTV he got 43 percent.

The other three official candidates all got single-digit coverage on all four national networks, with figures ranging from 6.8 percent to 0.1 percent, according to figures released by the Center for Journalism in Extreme Situations. Also unsurprisingly, President Vladimir Putin — who isn’t running, of course — got more airtime even than Medvedev, ranging around 50-60 percent.

The one oddity in this bland picture, however, was REN-TV, a small, but still-private national network. REN-TV’s figures are truly startling: 31 percent of the airtime went to Putin, followed by 21 percent for Medvedev, 22 percent for Liberal Democratic Party of Russia head Vladimir Zhirinovsky, 21 percent to Communist candidate Gennady Zyuganov, and 6.3 percent to Democratic Party head Andrei Bogdanov.

Such even-handedness is unheard of in Russian national media these days. The reduced percentage to Bogdanov can easily be justified by the facts that his support consistently polls at about 1 percent, that his party received less than 1 percent of the vote in the December Duma elections, and that his candidacy is widely seen to be a Kremlin-inspired stratagem to create the impression that at least one liberal politician is in the race.

The contrast between REN-TV and NTV is particularly noteworthy. NTV, it should be recalled, is the once-private and once-respected national television network that was taken over by Gazprom in 2000-01 as one of the first major steps in Putin’s dismantling of civil society. At the time, Gazprom claimed the takeover was merely a business dispute and senior managers pledged endlessly the network would be sold off in short order.

Now, seven years later, Medvedev is the chairman of Gazprom’s board of directors and that channel is outdoing even the formally state-controlled Channel One and Rossia in violating the law ensuring equal media access to all candidates and in contributing to what the liberal-posing Medvedev has eloquently described as “legal nihilism.”   —>
http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2008/03/A111BAE5-42D5-4F2E-8AD8-26E4E9D96723.html
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compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 02/26/08

February 27, 2008

One World accepts nominations for Special Achievement for Development Media award
Nominations Deadline: February 29
ijnet (International Center for Journalists)
02/26/08

[ comments allowed ]

One World Broadcasting has announced the Special Achievement Award for Development Media, one of this year’s One World Media Awards. The Special Achievement Award honors an outstanding community media project in the developing world. The deadline to nominate someone for this award is February 29.

The award is geared toward advocacy or grassroots media outlets or community radio/TV initiatives. Ideal projects will incorporate ideas for reaching wider audiences, find ways of making a lasting impact on the local community and have evidence of financial sustainability (through local or national support).

To find out how to apply, visit http://www.owbt.org/pages/Awards/awards2008/awards2008_specialaward.html —>
http://www.ijnet.org/Director.aspx?P=Article&ID=307311
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Ball State Study Sees Positive Effects From Indiana Telecom Bill
Finding Disputed by Cable Incumbents
by Linda Haugsted
Multichannel News
02/25/08

[ comments allowed ]

Ball State University has released a white paper stating that Indiana’s 2006 telecommunications reform bill has advanced the deployment of video and broadband services in the state, a finding disputed by cable incumbents in the state.  The 106-page report, dated Feb. 15 on the website of the Digital Policy Institute, concludes that HEA 1279 was good for the state and goes on to detail the expansion of digital-subscriber line, high-speed data lines and video service deployed since the bill was signed.

But Tim Oakes, executive director of the Indiana Cable Telecommunications Association, notes that the deployments referred to in the report were announced by providers such as AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc. before the bill was passed.  “To say the bill caused (these investments) is flat-out wrong,” he said…

Reports compliled by local officials in other states where franchising has been assigned to the state, such as Texas, Michigan and North Carolina, have concluded that published cable rates have not decreased due to the approval of state franchising bills. Special rates, offered as retention lures, may offer short term benefits, they have noted, but over the long term, rates continue to rise by all providers.
http://www.multichannel.com/article/CA6535240.html?nid=4262
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Norwalk PTO to put its proceedings on TV
by Lisa Chamoff
Stamford Advocate (CT)
02/26/08

A new reality television show is about to air.  The Parent Teacher Organization Council last night became one of the first city groups to begin recording its monthly meetings, and will air them starting next week on cable Channel 78, the regional educational access channel.

The program is part of an effort to keep parents informed and get them more involved in the schools. School officials are looking into recording biweekly Board of Education meetings.  Paul Blumenthal, PTO Council vice president for educational information, who works in video production, is coordinating the taping.  It will be one of the first city meetings to be broadcast.

“Apparently, other towns around Norwalk have a much more extensive use of their public access educational channel than we do,” Blumenthal said. “I think the school system will get better because people are more informed and more aware.”  Westport regularly televises its Board of Education meetings on Channel 78. Since 2002, it has used Channel 79, the local government station, to broadcast public meetings and forums. Some meetings are streamed live on the town’s Web site.

Eileen Zhang, director of Westport’s information technology department, said people are tuning in, though there is no way to count viewers.  Viewers e-mail questions that are answered during the meetings. People call Zhang when there are problems with the sound or picture quality.  “It definitely makes government more transparent,” she said.   —>
http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/local/scn-sa-televise4feb26,0,5681107.story
~

Spring Break Young Reporter’s Camp Springs Forwards with Applications
Akaku: Maui Community Television (HI)
by KaeoKepani
02/26/08

Back by popular demand, “Young Reporters Media Camp,” will take place during the State Department of Education Spring Break—starting on Monday, Mar. 17 through Friday, Mar. 21. Akaku is currently accepting applications until Wednesday, Mar. 5 and will select up to 10 students to attend the weeklong camp, which costs $200.

“Our previous Young Reporters Media Camp was a great success and proved to be an enriching opportunity for young people who are interested in serving their community through their media skills,” says Akaku education director Sara Tekula. “Young people are some of the most valuable witnesses to current events and happenings around Maui. Their perspectives will diversify the Maui Daily programming and attract more young viewers to the show.”

Students will learn what it takes to become “Youth Reporters” for The Maui Daily—Akaku’s latest community-based news program. In five days, they will become “youth certified” to borrow cameras and use editing equipment free-of-charge in order to create content for the program. Need-based scholarships will be available for motivated students accepted into the program. Camp hours will be from 9:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.   —>
http://www.akaku.org/?p=61
~

Media Savvy: Students learning to produce a basketball telecast
by Sam McManis
Sacramento Bee (CA)
02/26/08

[ 1 comment ]

2:42 p.m., outside the gym at Cosumnes River College.  Duct tape, to them, is lifeblood.  A full, fat roll dangles from Thorunn Gudjonsdottir’s wrist like a bracelet. It’ll come in handy as she and the rest of a crew of journalism students get ready to broadcast this evening’s women’s basketball game.

It is more than three hours before tipoff and an hour before any of the players will arrive, but the crew – a.k.a. Terry Finnegan’s advanced television production class – is already at work, scoping out the gym for camera positions. Also on hand: Richard Langley and Danny Mendonsa, engineers – and de facto teachers – from Access Sacramento, the region’s public-access TV channel.

Their transmission truck, nerve center of the operation, gingerly backs up as close to the gym as safety and school officials will allow.  “Breathing in exhaust gets that broadcast mojo going,” cracks Brandon Wells, the student director.   —>
http://www.sacbee.com/127/story/738435.html
~

Community access TV studio needs new home
by Paul Payne
Santa Rosa Press Democrat (CA)
02/26/08

[ comments allowed ]

The big break for C.J. Ramirez came when the regular anchor of Casa Grande High’s morning news program didn’t show up for work.  Ramirez, 16, who had been helping out around the public television station on the Petaluma campus, jumped in front of the camera. His gift for gab made him a natural and he moved into the spot on a permanent basis.  But his budding broadcast career — as well as the aspirations of other students who use the Petaluma Community Access studio — may soon be cut short.

Petaluma school district administrators announced recently that the station will have to move off campus by fall to make way for an anticipated surge of new students.  “It’s a little disappointing,” said Ramirez, a junior, after taping the morning show Tuesday. “I just started getting into this.”

His frustration is shared by the station’s small staff and volunteers, who have put their hearts into keeping it going and just completed a digital conversion that cost about $34,000.  Julie Akins, the executive director and a former San Francisco newscaster, said she will begin looking for new space but won’t be able to afford anything nearly as large or well-appointed as their Casa Grande home, which was free.

Akins said the station — which airs government and educational programs on channels 26, 27 and 28 on Petaluma’s cable TV system — will likely become a mobile studio with a small warehouse office for computer servers.  “It’s probably the only thing we can do,” said Akins, who was hired last year and oversees a $200,000 a year budget. “I don’t see how we can afford a 2,000 square-foot facility. We’re talking mega-bucks that we don’t have.”   —>
http://www1.pressdemocrat.com/article/20080226/NEWS/732616256/1033/NEWS01
~

Channel 11 interlocal agreement possible
by Larry Grard
Kennebec Journal Morning Sentinel (ME)
02/26/08

[ 2 comments ]

MADISON — Public access station Channel 11 on Monday night advanced closer to an interlocal agreement its board members have long sought.  A skeptical Board of Selectmen gave the go-ahead for Channel 11 and Bee Line Cable TV Co. to work out a franchise fee that might help the station operate independently. The towns of Anson and Skowhegan have signed an interlocal agreement, but Madison — home to the station — has held out.  Channel 11 operates on a $25,000 budget that is funneled through the three towns from Bee Line Cable.   —>
http://morningsentinel.mainetoday.com/news/local/4807153.html
~

Rutland gets PEGged
Public access TV expands with new kitchen studio space, weather, Internet
by Brent Curtis
Rutland Herald (VT)
02/26/08

[ comments allowed ]

Public access television in Rutland is more accessible with more things to watch than ever before.  Rutland Community Access PEG TV has added new online features allowing Internet users to access its three channels worldwide and is adding cooking and local weather to its programming lineup.  “We’ve been busy,” said Michael J. Valentine, executive director of the local television studio located at the Howe Center.  During the last eight months, PEG has upgraded its Web site to allow streaming videos of scheduled programming and video on demand of archived material…

While the technological upgrades hold the most far-reaching potential for PEG, the decision to add cooking to its programming repertoire has had the most impact on the station’s studio space.  To host community generated cooking shows, PEG officials converted an empty and unfinished storage space into a state-of-the art kitchen complete with a commercial refrigerator, range, oven and vent-hood and granite countertops.   —>
http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080226/NEWS01/802260343/1002/NEWS01
~

Empowering Your Organization Through Media
Portland Office of Neighborhood Involvement (OR)
02/26/08

Tuesday, April 3, 2007; 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM…  Learn more on how Portland Community Media can help you get your message to the community through effective and creative use of media. Workshop will share real world examples of local groups that have used video and media resources to inform, educate and engage their communities.   —>
http://www.portlandonline.com/oni/index.cfm?c=37087&a=186254
~

Attacks spur defense classes, safety forum
by Tammy Krikorian
Reno Gazette-Journal (NV)
02/26/08

—>   As safety concerns spread beyond the college community after the killing of Brianna Denison, a community safety forum tonight will inform residents of what is being done to keep them safe…  Representatives from Reno police; University of Nevada, Reno; the Associated Students of the University of Nevada; and community members will be on the panel.The event, scheduled from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Sierra Nevada Community Access Television Studio, 4024 Kietzke Lane, will be taped and rebroadcast… A programming schedule soon will be available at http://www.sncat.org —>
http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080226/NEWS01/802260347/1321/NEWS
~

Reasonable Doubt: January 24, 2008
by Mark Bennett
HCCLA Blog – Harris County Criminal Lawyer’s Assoc. (TX)
02/26/08

[ comments allowed ]

HCCLA’s Reasonable Doubt public-access TV show from January 24, 2008.  [Google Video]
http://www.hccla.org/blog/index.php?/archives/17-Reasonable-Doubt-January-24,-2008.html
~

Who in the Health Cares? Patient Safety Week – March 3-8, 2008
by Save the Patient
The Earth Times
02/26/08

[ comments allowed ]

CHICAGO – Continuing its efforts to educate, inform, and empower the people of Chicago, SAVE THE PATIENT, a not-for-profit patient-focused organization, is hosting its 25-minute live call-in show, “Community Health,” on Chicago Access Network (CAN-TV) on Monday, March 3, at 6:00 PM on Channel 21.

Monday’s program will feature a frank discussion on what is currently being done, or not done, when it comes to patient safety, and most importantly, how to protect yourself and your family from hospital- and community-based infections. Find out about the Illinois Health Report Card, sponsored by Senator Barack Obama and the General Assembly.   —>
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/who-in-the-health-cares-patient-safety-week-march-3-8-2008,293036.shtml
~

Foamhenge & Public Access Puppetry
by Andrew
Puppet Vision Blog
02/26/08

Public access television was the YouTube of the pre-web era. In the 1980s and early `90s it was a fertile breeding ground for puppet video, producing underground hits like Ed the Sock, Greg the Bunny and Mystery Science Theater 3000 that were later picked up by cable channels and found mainstream success.

Considering just how many puppeteers got started working on public access, it’s always great to see these old videos making their way on to the web. Brian Stokes has been uploading some videos to YouTube from LifeFormz, an Academy award-winning college TV access puppetry & animation show he worked on from 1993-95 at the University of Pennsylvania. I particularly like Foamhenge, a sketch that reminds me of the Muppets’ old Mount Rushmore sketch.   —>
http://puppetvision.blogspot.com/2008/02/foamhenge-public-access-puppetry.html
~

Jane Pauley I am not
by KarmaTee
Alligator Cowboy Boots (CO)
02/26/08

[ 2 comments ]

I went to journalism school to study print journalism. Yes, I have always considered myself a writer (blog readers everywhere snigger), but I also at one point in my life toyed with the idea of being a television news reporter/anchor/producer. It all seemed so glamorous, and I *have* always had a thing for brightly colored clothing.

But, when I got to the hallowed halls of Missouri’s J-school, I quickly realized one thing: The pretty, bubbly girls did broadcast. The alternative-y, hipster girls did photo. The poetic, romantic girls did magazine.  And the brainiac, mildly angry, can’t-be-bothered-to-get-dressed-up- because-I-don’t-like-walking-across-campus-in-heels girls did news-editorial.  Guess which category I fit into.

I was not then, and am not now, a shining example of Barbie incarnate, so broadcast was definitely out of the question. Did you know in college, the broadcast advisors would sit each girl down (guys too) and tell them every one of their flaws to correct, how much weight to lose and how to cut their hair, and what clothes to wear? And then they got graded on it? Mizzou isn’t alone in this practice, and even after college, professional talking heads all have contracts that stipulate appearance maintenance. It’s why you never see a female anchor over the age of 50– Botox and makeup only do so much.

Where am I going with this, you ask?  Nearly eight years after pretty much having the door to a broadcast career slammed in my not-symmetrical-enough face, I find myself talking on television. FREQUENTLY.

It is a small town, and it is community access, so I am not thinking this is a reversal of J-school priorities. But in the last 10 days, I have been videotaped for television programs twice. Once they snuck it up on me… I was part of a speaker panel at the college and didn’t realize the damn thing was going on Durango Community Access Television. Then, today, a producer with CitySpan 10, the other local channel, came and interviewed me, on camera, for a five-minute spot they’re going to do on our nonprofit agency.   —>
http://alligatorcowboyboots.blogspot.com/2008/02/2_26.html
~

GVTC captures record number of Hill Country customers
San Antonio Business Journal (TX)
02/26/08

GVTC Communications continues to grow at a break-neck pace. For the first time in the company’s history, GVTC has more than 10,000 cable customers.  Officials with the Smithson Valley company say this is a 27 percent increase in cable subscribers over the last three years…  GVTC is garnering positive feedback from customers for providing coverage of local Smithson Valley and Boerne high school football and basketball games on the public access channel.   —>
http://www.bizjournals.com/sanantonio/stories/2008/02/25/daily16.html
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 02/21/08

February 22, 2008

An Emmy for Euille?

by Michael Lee Pope
Alexandria Gazette Packet (VA)
02/20/08

Members of the Alexandria City Council are frequently recognized when they are about town. But are they television stars?

According to a recent survey of Comcast users, viewership of City Council meetings has increased 60 percent from last year to an all-time high. A whopping 86 percent of Comcast subscribers responded that they had watched a City Council meeting during the last year. Only 58 percent of respondents, by comparison, said they watched a School Board meeting in the last year.  “We should get an Emmy,” cracked Mayor Bill Euille during last week’s City Council meeting.   —>
http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/article.asp?paper=59&cat=104&article=93798
~

Where is the Love
The “Reel” and Visible Truth about Pleasant Prairie (WI)
02/21/08

[ 5 comments ]

—>   The Lt. Gov suggested per Mr. Babcock that municipalities LIKE PLEASANT PRAIRIE take action to put videotaping of Board Meetings, etc, so that citizens have a source of news.  This is nothing new, and I have been preaching this idea for around 2 years now. In order to show that it is not a TECHNICALLY DIFFICULT effort, we have begun videotaping and putting unedited clips of board meetings since 11/19/2007 onto YOUTUBE at http://www.youtube.com/PleasantPrairieWI.

The village leaders such as Trustee Mike Serpe have justified NOT HAVING MEETINGS ON CH25 as being “BORING”, and classified them as a good sedative if they were to make it onto CH25.   —>
http://pleasantprairiewi.blogspot.com/2008/02/where-is-love.html
~

Student volunteers help cable TV programs happen
by Bev Wax
Dover-Sherborn Press (MA)
02/21/08

[ comments allowed ]

DOVER and SHERBORN – To get a taste of what young people think about Boston sports teams, Dover-Sherborn residents of all ages may want to tune into “The Roundtable” on DSCTV. Four students and three faculty members make up the talk show panel that comes across as personable, opinionated, entertaining and often quite funny.

The monthly show is part of a course taught by Mike Sweeney, media coordinator for Dover-Sherborn High School. The first episode covers a short summary of high school sports team standings; Curt Schilling’s ability to pitch for the Red Sox; the Celtics’ wins; the Patriots’ loss; and the recent testimony of Roger Clemens on steroid use.

Sweeney hopes the program “will show the students the benefit of their hard work” in a studio setting. The program is part of Video/Media II class focusing on basic script writing, camera technique and digital editing. A requirement is the completion of Video/Media I, where “students work together as a team, learn about media literacy and ethics, and how to produce and direct.”

Two other DSHS programs are currently produced: the monthly “Raider Report” for Video/Media II and “Spinners” for Video/Media I that is produced every two to three weeks. Sweeney said, “ ‘Raider Report’ is a news magazine that showcases events, faculty and student achievement in the high school. ‘Spinners’ is a game show that is our longest running program and has produced about 200 episodes.”   —>
http://www.wickedlocal.com/dover/news/education/x1637670682
~

Ready for prime time: Niagara Falls students run cable-access channel
by Emma D. Sapong
Buffalo News (NY)
02/20/08

It’s just 7:30 a.m., but the students of “High School Live” are already energized, hurling TV production jargon at each other, as they prepare for the morning newscast. Upbeat, chatty anchors assemble before the cameras for a practice run, while other students ready the cameras and review the show’s script on the teleprompter. When 8:15 rolls around, the three anchors announce sports scores, upcoming school events, mix in some world news, college scholarship opportunities and the SAT word of the day. “It’s really neat to have something like this in our school,” said junior Kelly O’Brien, one of the rotating anchors of “High School Live,” the TV show that replaced traditional morning announcements at Niagara Falls High School.

The morning newscast is just the start of the enthusiasm and passion students maintain throughout the day while upholding their unique responsibility of creating more than two dozen shows from the school’s studio for Niagara County educational access channel and a potential viewership of 45,000 people.

“It’s my life, honestly,” said junior Anthony Wright, who produces, directs and hosts multiple shows. “It’s really what makes me happy. If there were no media studies program, it would just be another day at school.”  Anthony, 17, is one of 140 students enrolled in the school’s media studies elective, which trains them in TV production with their work airing on Our Schools Channel 21, the Niagara County’s educational access station on Time Warner.   —>
http://www.buffalonews.com/185/story/280722.html
~

Cinemat celebration showcases student work
by Rosemary Pennington
Indiana University School of Journalism
02/21/08

Last year, Bloomington residents nominated almost 100 area volunteers for the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network’s Heart and Hand award, a handful of whom were profiled at a video showcase at the Cinemat Thursday evening.

“I’d like to thank you all for being here tonight,” BVN Director Bet Savich said to a crowded room of School of Journalism graduate students and area volunteers. “We hope that tonight is a celebration of volunteerism as well as inspiration for those who aren’t already involved to become involved.”

The Volunteer Video Showcase was the culmination of assistant professor Mike Conway’s J520 Video Storytelling class. The class, offered last semester, was designed to teach graduate students the skills needed to create rich, textured stories using video.

“We at the School of Journalism are trying to adapt to the changing media world,” Conway told the crowd. “We’re training the next generation of journalists and we want them to have the skills they need to work in this new environment.”

One of the class assignments last semester was to profile the Heart and Hand nominees. The students combed through 89 essays written about the nominees; from those essays, they chose several to profile. The BVN then connected the students and volunteers.   —>
http://journalism.indiana.edu/news/cinemat-celebration-showcases-student-work/
~

Have your say about Verizon
by Ron Cox
Malden Observer (MA)
02/21/08

[ comments allowed ]

On Thursday, Feb. 28 beginning at 6 p.m., there will be a public hearing regarding the current negotiations with Verizon Communications to become a second provider of cable television for Malden residents. This is good news for consumers because it means our city will have someone other than Comcast and satellite dishes to choose from, and that brings more competition to viewers.   —>
http://www.wickedlocal.com/malden/news/lifestyle/columnists/x257793913
~

TV Party and Unmasked at the New Museum
by B. Blagojevi
The Zine (NY)
02/21/08

Tomorrow night at the New Museum, non-commercial, art television variety show host Glenn O’Brien will present various selected clips form his well known New York public access show TV PARTY, active from 1978 through 1982. The show hosted many bands and musicians of note who would visit to perform or to be interviewed, not the least of which was David Byrne and Debbie Harry.   —>
http://zine.artcal.net/2008/02/tv-party-and-unmasked-at-the-n.php
~

Stayton Discusses Skate Park During City Council Meeting
by Ken Cartwright
KENC Radio (OR)
02/20/08

[ 1 comment ]

—>   Council and audience has had trouble for years hearing the council meetings. It was also suggested that with the forthcoming Community Access Television and the community radio wanting to broadcast council meetings live, and other media needing a media audio port, it was time for the council to take action and replace the system.

A proposal was made that an adequate system would cost about $10,000 and would not only serve the community center, but the new city hall if and when the city is able to build one. It is further proposed that the city pay for it from future revenue that the city collects from television cable franchise fees. It was indicated that the city collects a 5% fee from the cable company and has for at least 16 years but has never invested any of that money in community cable access or audio for the city council.   —>
http://salem-news.com/articles/february202008/stayton_2-20-08.php
~

Time Warner agrees to cover taping of St. Patrick’s Day Parade
by Brian Meyer
Buffalo News (NY)
02/21/08

In an earlier era, the former Rita O’Leary would trek downtown to watch her dad march in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade.  Now in her 70s, Rita Smith enjoys watching the event from her living room couch when it’s aired on Buffalo’s cable television system.  “It’s too cold for me to sit outside that long,” the Old First Ward resident said.  Smith’s heart sank when she read Wednesday that the March 16 parade might not be taped for later viewing. Time Warner Cable informed the not-for-profit parade sponsor that it would no longer provide free production services.

She was thrilled to hear that the company did an about-face and agreed to provide video crews for one more year.  “When you’re home and not able to go out, you’re always looking for something different,” she said. “I like to watch for people I know who march in the parade.”

Time Warner’s reversal came after the city’s cable franchise faced blistering criticism for insisting that parade organizers either pay a $3,500 production fee or find their own video crews. Some Common Council members assailed the city’s cable television franchise, saying it can afford to absorb the costs.

One day after lawmakers criticized the decision, Time Warner sent a follow-up letter to the United Irish-American Association of Erie County.  “In this one instance, we will supply you with a crew to film your parade,” wrote Robin L. Wolfgang, vice president of public and government relations.

She said parade sponsors should work with the city to secure time slots on one of Buffalo’s public access channels. In past years, the parade was aired on Time Warner’s Channel 13. But last November, the company launched Time Warner Sports Net on the channel. It carries a heavy schedule of college and high school games.

“This compromise should accomplish your goals of broadcasting the parade for the widest viewing audience,” Wolfgang wrote. “We hope you also recognize this donation and sacrifice Time Warner Cable is making in order to ensure that followers and participants of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade have a resource to view it in their home.”

Wolfgang made it clear that in future years, the company’s ability to cover such events will be “limited” and that parade organizers should work with video crews from the city’s public access channels to secure production services. The public access channels are funded through money provided by Time Warner as part of its franchise agreement.   —>
http://www.buffalonews.com/home/story/281413.html
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 02/03/08

February 4, 2008

AT&T’s stand against franchising rules is potentially discriminatory
by Bishop George Price
The Tennessean
02/03/08

Almost a half-century ago, the battle for civil rights and equal opportunity raged throughout the communities of Tennessee.  Leaders like Maxine Smith, Z. Alexander Looby and NAACP counsel Thurgood Marshall fought to level the legal playing field so that the minority children of the north Nashville neighborhood had merely the chance to compete with the wealthier children of Belle Meade.

Fifty years later, the challenges to fairness and equality in Tennessee have taken on a new light. For young boys and girls of all groups, having the skills necessary to compete in the 21st-century information age and its rapidly changing economy is today’s greatest challenge. Every day, those skills are being delivered through information technology and high-speed Internet.

It is all the more critical that we do everything in our power to ensure that deployment of new broadband technologies is carried out in a fair, equitable and expeditious manner, so that the boys and girls of north Nashville get a chance to compete alongside other young Tennesseans, and the rest of the world, in the ever-expanding global marketplace.

As we speak, the legislature is set to take up a bill aimed at rewriting how new broadband and video technologies offered by cable and telephone companies are deployed.  AT&T and its army of well-paid lobbyists want to eviscerate the local franchising rules that authorize cities and towns to require that, when new video and broadband providers come into town, they commit to offering service to all residents and every neighborhood, without discrimination and within a reasonable and enforceable amount of time.   —>
http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080203/OPINION03/802030371/1008/OPINION01
~

Cable, AT&T debate revs up
Many fear new franchise deal would weaken school TV aid
by Kevin McKenzie
Commercial Appeal (TN)
02/03/08

As executive director of Germantown Community Television and a teacher at Germantown High School, E. Frank Bluestein keeps repeating a question that’s vexed him for a year.

AT&T, the Texas-based telecommunications giant, in 2007 began pushing legislation in Nashville that would smooth the way for a new video service that would compete with cable television. AT&T’s proposal is aimed at the local government control that has nurtured high school television stations in Germantown and Collierville since the dawn of cable TV.  The company, which absorbed BellSouth a year ago, is pushing for legislative change again this year. That prompts Bluestein’s question:

“In this country, does the public not realize that AT&T is writing the legislation to benefit themselves?” Bluestein asked.  “There is something wrong with this picture, that big business has control over the state legislature to the point they are writing the bills.”

Meanwhile, for the past three Wednesdays, representatives of AT&T, the cable television industry, Tennessee legislators who would sponsor a bill and others have gathered to mull the very legislation that concerns Bluestein.  In Nashville, House Speaker Jimmy Naifeh, D-Covington, called the stakeholders together and said he would like them to seek a solution, said Bill Ray, assistant vice president, external affairs for AT&T in Memphis.  “It’s not entirely written by AT&T” Ray said.

Civics lessons aren’t usually what Bluestein teaches, but he’s a potent voice for “PEG” stations — those providing programming for cable channels set aside for public, educational or governmental access.  Local cable franchises, which allow cities to levy fees and regulate cable companies as the price of using public rights of way, provide the foundation for PEG stations.

In Germantown, city hall’s insistence through the years for strong cable company support for the Shelby County School’s GHS-TV Channel 17 has helped produce stellar results training students and winning awards.  Collierville High also operates a cable television station, Channel 19, supported by the local franchise agreement between town hall and Comcast.   —>
http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2008/feb/03/cable-att-debate-revs-up/
~

San Jose prepares to shift public-access channel to non-profit
Non-Profit to Run Public-Access TV
by Stephen Baxter
San Jose Mercury News (CA)
02/03/08

San Jose’s public-access TV channel is preparing for a surge of new participants, facilities and a fresh multimedia approach.  The San Jose City Council last week approved channeling hundreds of thousands of dollars from Comcast to San Jose Media Access, a non-profit group that will manage Channel 15 beginning July 1. The group also plans to open a new TV studio at a location to be decided and try to bring in new volunteers to improve its programs.

A Comcast studio at 1900 S. 10th St. has been the main production center for Channel 15 for at least 15 years. In December 2006, Comcast agreed to get the non-profit group on its feet with more than $3 million, and Comcast pledged to continue with annual payments of roughly $1.2 million – or about 1 percent of its quarterly gross revenue.  To run Comcast’s studio, the city collected money from franchise fees tacked to Comcast subscribers’ bills each month. With the city council’s approval Tuesday, that money will be directed to the non-profit group.

Participants say the Comcast studio provided little training for budding TV producers, and only about 100 people consistently participate in making shows.  Comcast spokesman Andrew Johnson indicated that a non-profit group dedicated to public TV would be more focused on producing community television and providing training.  “We certainly value the important part that public access plays in the community, but we feel that it’s best handled by a non-profit group,” he said.

Similar non-profit groups have been set up in San Francisco, Petaluma and other cities, and leaders of the new public-access TV non-profit plan to hold fundraisers and seek private donors. None of its money comes from San Jose’s general fund.  Some cities have had success with the non-profit model, while others, such as Petaluma and the Tri-Valley area of San Ramon, Dublin and Pleasanton, have struggled with funding.   —>
http://www.mercurynews.com/valley/ci_8155976?nclick_check=1
~

Unsung Heroes Heralded
Media Center airs series on 7 Bay Area residents
by Jason Greene and Jamie Casini
San Mateo Daily News (CA)
02/03/08

They operate under the radar, assisting the families of the mentally ill, organizing peace marches, setting up scholarships for immigrant high school students.  They promote socially conscious educational products, help the homeless get back on their feet and beat the odds doctors said they couldn’t overcome.

And though these individuals might prefer to remain out of the limelight, they are being recognized for their achievements and contributions to society. Beginning today, the Midpeninsula Community Media Center of Palo Alto will air its second “Faces of Local Heroes,” a series that focuses on extraordinary people who don’t make headlines day-in and day-out, creator Louise Pencavel said.   —>
http://sanmateodailynews.com/article/2008-2-3-all-local-heroes
~

Your alt media experiences await
by Professor T
Media for All –  University of Regina School of Journalism
02/03/08

List of mini-internships. The sign-up book is on Shelley’s desk.

Access 7

Be a part of community television and you’ll discover the most interesting news is close to home. The type of work you do will depend on your interests and schedule – Access 7’s volunteer coordinator will meet with you to develop a workplan. You will have opportunity to do both studio and remote work, with full training offered. Interns may also undertake documentary projects with community agencies. The main thing asked is that you follow through with commitments to be in a certain place at a certain time: no no-shows. Special note: you will enjoy the luxury of not having to pack your stories into 30 seconds or less. This is a good opportunity to dig deeper and learn more about the world just outside your door.
http://media4all.blogspot.com/2008/02/your-alt-media-experiences-await.html
~

Media Justice: Community Media
by brownfemipower
La Chola
02/03/08

From an interview with Amy Goodman about progressive community media…

“We just did an hour with Lou Dobbs, who could probably be compared to Father Coughlin, though he denied that. I did the interview with my co-host Juan Gonzalez, who writes for the New York Daily News, a great journalist. We tried to stick to the facts.

“We asked Dobbs about assertions he continually repeats, like a third of our prisoners are illegal aliens. Well, it’s just not true: 6 percent of prisoners in the state and federal systems are immigrants. And that’s divided between legal and undocumented, well below their representation in the population. If you keep hammering away that a third of the prisoners in this country are illegal aliens, then people are going to feel that they shouldn’t be here.

“It’s the litany of misinformation, of lies, that really makes people afraid and turns fear into full-blown hate. I think that has to be exposed.

“The beauty of community media is that we break the sound barriers, that we open up the microphones for people to speak for themselves. And then it’s harder to call people labels. I think it’s an epithet to talk about illegal aliens. They don’t sound human. You can set any kind of policy on a population when you don’t talk to them as human beings.   —>
http://brownfemipower.com/?p=2273
~

From Imagining the (Un)thinkable
by Colin Rhinesmith
Community Media in Transition (MA)
02/03/08

In 2007, the Funding Exchange Media Justice Fund published a journal, entitled “Imagining the (Un)thinkable” which as the website explains:

“This collection of essays pushes the boundaries of current research on media policy and provides critical information on the potential power of the internet, radio, and community-access TV to enhance social justice movements. Written from perspectives of people of color, low-income people, women and other marginalized communities, the report offers useful tools and strategies for media justice advocates.”

In their chapter on “Owning the Airwaves through Community-Access TV,” authors Lyell Davies and Betty Yu write about how community access TV centers can support social justice organizations through “effective outreach and assistance” to ensure that marginalized communities, such as “LGBTQ, low-income, immigrant, youth, differently-abled, or communities of color,” are not excluded from the “first-come-first-serve” model of community access television.

Through this process, community access TV centers – as “community media centers” – can help connect social justice organizations to the “media multi-purposing” possibilities that Internet distribution tools, like blogs and podcasts, provide in helping them reach “multiple audiences in multiple ways” about their work in the community:

“To meet the needs of this expanding communications arena, community-access TV centers need to reinvent themselves as ‘community media centers’ and provide services supporting the varied media platforms now in use. This may mean engaging in conventional cable-access TV production, but it may also mean assisting in the production of a short video for web vlogging or in the creation of an interactive website . . .

Also, local community-access TV centers have a role to play in building a ‘physical’ community; while the Internet has led to the creation of new ‘virtual’ communities, the kind of intimate networks fostered by local TV making and viewing—and the presence of a ‘bricks-and-mortar’ meeting center like an access TV station—are still central to many political struggles, community empowerment efforts, and campaigns for social justice.”

To download the full report, visit the Funding Exchange Media Justice Fund
http://cmediachange.net/blog/2008/02/03/from-imagining-the-unthinkable/
~

Challenging Corporate Media
by ShiftShapers
Wild Resistance
02/03/08

Independent media has a rich, long history. Linchpin is following in and updating a tradition known for dissent, diversity, and the creation, cultivation and communication of new and challenging ideas, writes Greg Macdougall.
From Linchpin #2 (Canada)

While there may be longstanding problems with the way mainstream media works, what doesn’t have such a long and storied history is the rise of ‘mega-media’, the mass corporate media institutions that put control of ever more of our society’s means of communication into the hands of fewer and fewer for-profit companies. It is only in the past decade or two that this problem has reached critical levels, yet it’s been ushered in as if this is ‘business as usual.’

But it isn’t business as usual. Laws regulating media have been changed, media companies have been bought up and/or merged at an alarming rate, and the media landscape is vastly different now than it was a generation ago.

Not only does this result in a distracting ‘if it bleeds it leads’ monoculture that delivers a worldview encouraging non-action and the acceptance of an insane status quo, but there is the continuing problem of an inherent conflict of interest between what is good for society and what makes money. We need to seriously consider the fundamental purpose of our society’s communication tools and structure.   —>
http://shiftshapers.gnn.tv/blogs/26975/Challenging_Corporate_Media
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 01/31/08

February 1, 2008

AT&T Knocked for ‘Inferior’ PEG Channels
Alliance for Community Media Complains About U-verse TV to House Subcommittee
by Todd Spangler
Multichannel News
1/31/08

The Internet-based technology AT&T touts as giving it an edge over the cable industry was criticized this week by the Alliance for Community Media as providing an “inferior” platform for public, educational and government channels.  The ACM, which represents some 3,000 PEG organizations, singled out AT&T’s U-verse TV PEG access as “sub-par, low resolution [and] cumbersome” in testimony at a Jan. 29 meeting of the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet.

“PEG channels are confined to a separate system inferior to commercial channels on AT&T’s system in virtually every way that matters to a viewer,” said Annie Folger, executive director of the Palo Alto, Calif.-based Midpeninsula Media Center, representing the ACM.

Among the deficiencies Folger cited: AT&T’s PEG channels do not allow closed-captioning; the telco’s own digital video recorders cannot record the PEG channels; video resolution is as much as 25% lower than commercial channels; and the channels take anywhere from 45 to 90 seconds to load.  On the lack of closed-captioning, ACM executive director Anthony Riddle said in a statement that AT&T’s “willingness to sacrifice the needs of disabled students in a race for profit certainly makes them the poster child of corporate irresponsibility.”   —>
http://www.multichannel.com/article/CA6527813.html
~

[ This lengthy article is noteworthy, not because of any new details about Comcast’s channel slamming plans in Michigan, but because it provides a huge amount of detail about some of the channels and the programming that would be affected by the Comcast action. – rm ]

Cable battle over local access placement now shifts to courts
by Andrew Sawmiller
Spinal Column Weekly (MI)
01/30/08

—>  Most of the lakes area is represented on cable television service issues by the Western Oakland County Cable Communications Authority (WOCCCA), which covers the lakes area communities of Wixom, Walled Lake, Wolverine Lake, Commerce, Milford village and township, White Lake, and Highland.

The Greater West Bloomfield Cable Advisory Board represents West Bloomfield and Orchard Lake, and the Waterford Cable Advisory Board represents cable customers in Waterford.  Each body typically has the ability to show and host public access shows, educational or school-related programming, and local government programming.   —>
http://www.spinalcolumnonline.com/1editorialbody.lasso?-token.folder=2008-01-30&-token.story=54617.113117&-nothing
~

Bredesen Questions Approach To Fight Over Cable Permitting
Associated Press
News Channel 5 (TN)
01/31/08

Gov. Phil Bredesen is questioning the approach by House Speaker Jimmy Naifeh in the fight to change cable permitting rules in Tennessee to encourage broadband access around the state.  In an interview with the Chattanooga Times Free Press on Thursday, Bredesen said he doesn’t “think what Speaker Naifeh is trying to do can be successful” since the two sides are taking opposite positions on the franchising authority request.  Bredesen, a Democrat, reiterated comments he said earlier this month that he may get involved in the contentious cable proposal.   —>
http://www.newschannel5.com/Global/story.asp?S=7805800
~

Wisconsin: A case study in how corporations get the legislation they want
by Bruce Kushnick
Nieman Watchdog – Questions the Press Should Ask
01/31/08

In my first piece on the corporate-sponsored American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), I described a network of special interest groups working with big business to peddle so-called “model bills” to state legislators across the country. The state of Wisconsin is a classic example of how ALEC operates. At the 2001 ALEC national convention, Tommy Thompson, former Wisconsin governor and then U.S. Secretary of Health And Human Services, stated:

“It’s wonderful to see so many of my friends from the great state of Wisconsin. There are 29 members of the  Wisconsin State Legislature who were so eager to come to New York for this conference that they rushed to get the state budget passed last week….My good friend Scott Jensen is among them. Scott holds the only job I ever wanted and never reached – Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly.”

In addition to the 29 state legislators that Thompson claimed as ALEC members, I and others working with me found at least three currently sitting Wisconsin politicians who have sponsored bills with ties to ALEC – Wisconsin Senator Ted Kanavas, Senator Jeff Plale and Representative Phil Montgomery, who was given ALEC’s 2005 “Legislator of the Year” award.

Like ALEC members around the U.S., these legislators have some clout. In 2003, Kanavas and Montgomery were part of Wisconsin’s “Special Committee on Public and Private Broadband”. Plale chairs the influential Wisconsin Senate Committee on Commerce, Utilities and Rail, the committee considering the most recently introduced telecommunications bill. Jensen, the former Speaker of the State Assembly, co-sponsored one of the bills in question.

These Wisconsin lawmakers are responsible for at least four bills that appear to correspond to ALEC-generated “models” that mainly help only the state’s major phone incumbent, AT&T. (Only ALEC members have access to the full text of the group’s model bills, but bill titles are listed on its Web site and are suggestive of the contents.) Let’s examine these four AT&T-friendly bills.

1) The Broadband Deployment Act of 2003: Kanavas & Jensen (ALEC model: Broadband and Telecommunications Deployment Act)…
2) Municipal broadband bill, co-sponsored by Kanavas & Montgomery; 2004 (ALEC model: Municipal Telecommunications Private Industry Safeguards Act)…
3) Video Competition Act, co-sponsored by Montgomery & Plale; 2007 (ALEC model: Cable and Video Competition Act)…
4) Telephone Deregulation Bill, co-sponsored by Montgomery & Plale; 2007 (ALEC model: Advanced Voice Services Availability Act of 2007)   —>
http://niemanwatchdog.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=background.view&backgroundid=00226
~

Northborough: Cable Negotiations Underway
by John Dyer
Boston Globe (MA)
01/31/08

Town officials are negotiating separate agreements with two cable-television providers, said Kathleen Dalgliesh, director of Northborough Cable Access Television. The town’s 10-year contract with Comcast expires in October, and the town is seeking a new five-year contract with the company, she said. The town has also received a formal application from Verizon, which has wired Northborough for telephone and Internet service but is seeking to expand its offerings to include cable television. Verizon wants a 15-year contract but the town favors a shorter agreement, Dalgliesh said. Important issues in the negotiations with Verizon include making sure all residents have access to cable television, and determining the amount of funding local public-access facilities will receive, she said. The Board of Selectmen is expected to consider Verizon’s application again in a few weeks, Dalgliesh said.
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2008/01/31/superintendent_finalists/?page=3
~

Pair offers TV show to bridge Brazilian divide
by Tanya Pérez-Brennan
Boston Globe (MA)
01/31/08

A couple active in Framingham’s Brazilian community has created a bilingual television program meant to serve as a cultural bridge between Brazilians and Americans.  The hour show, “Maraberto TV,” premiered Sunday on the public-access cable television system, airing on Comcast Channel 9, RCN Channel 3, and Verizon Channel 43 in Framingham. It will be on Sundays at 6 p.m., rerun Mondays at 3 and 10 a.m.   —>
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2008/01/31/pair_offers_tv_show_to_bridge_brazilian_divide/
~

What day works for you?
PATV (IA)
01/31/08

Howdy PATV Producers –  In the quest to find the perfect day and time to host the return of PATV’s live monthly soapbox, that is, “Open Channel Live”, we want to hear from you.  What days and times would YOU prefer to be on live tv to make an announcement, sing a song, broadcast your outrage or whatever?  Mondays? Fridays?  Or perhaps Saturdays?  Let us know!  Email us at contact[at]patv[dot]tv or do it the ol’ fashioned way and call us at 319-338-7035.  We’d love to hear from you.
http://patv.tv/blog/2008/01/31/what-day-works-for-you/
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 01/28/08

January 28, 2008

Editorial: How will AT&T’s Legislation affect Channel 9?
by Mark Madison
WBHS9 (TN)

Dear Editor:
Your recent article regarding AT&T’s proposed legislation stirred a response from Paul Stinson, Manager of Regulatory and External Affairs for AT&T. On January 7th, a meeting was held with Mr. Stinson, Mr. Keidel, a concerned parent and me. After the meeting I sat down and composed a list comparing the status quo with what AT&T has proposed for Access channels like WBHS9.    —>
http://www.wcs.edu/bhs/WBHS9/WBHS-9/editorial.htm
~

Carney, Markell, meet for debate on public access show
Associated Press ( 3 comments)
Delaware Online
01/28/08

WILMINGTON – The two prominent Democrats vying for the party’s nomination for governor met face-to-face Sunday for their first debate of the campaign.  Lt. Gov. John Carney and state Treasurer Jack Markell appeared on a public access television program hosted by Wilmington City Councilman Charles Potter.   —>
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080128/NEWS/80128008
~

Symington vies with Douglas for public access viewers
by Terri Hallenbeck (8 comments)
Burlington Free Press (VT)
01/28/08

MONTPELIER — Vermonters who click their way to public access television thinking they might catch a glimpse of the governor’s news conferences, as they did in the past, are finding a different Statehouse show.  Gov. Jim Douglas’ news conferences have not been aired on public access television stations since July, when the last production company’s contract ended. Those tapings will resume this week, Douglas spokesman Jason Gibbs said, with the governor’s staff doing the camera work.

Starting last week, House Speaker Gaye Symington launched her own “In Your Statehouse” show. The half-hour program focuses on a different topic each week.  “It’s an effort to help Vermonters understand our work,” she said.  Symington said her political action committee, the Speaker’s Circle, is paying the cost of production — about $74-$80 a week. The tapes are sent to public access television stations around the state…

… Lauren-Glenn Davitian, executive director of CCTV, said Vermont politicians have long seen the advantage of reaching constituents directly. Former Gov. Howard Dean did it when he was lieutenant governor. Douglas did it when he was treasurer and secretary of state, she said.
http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080128/NEWS02/80128006/1007
~

AT&T will start offering TV service
Video option begins Monday in suburbs
by Jon Van
Chicago Tribune (IL)
01/28/08

After a few false starts and missed deadlines, AT&T Inc. launches video service for residents in most Chicago suburbs Monday.  AT&T’s TV service, called U-verse, will become available in parts of 175 suburbs. The rollout will be low-key to guard against unrealistic consumer expectations, AT&T executives said, but it does mark the phone giant’s largest foray into television.   —>
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-mon_att_0128jan28,1,6554781.story?ctrack=1&cset=true
~

U-verse TV Pitched to Chicago Suburbs
AT&T Launches in 175-Plus Northeast Illinois Communities
by Todd Spangler
Multichannel News
01/28/08

AT&T is blowing U-verse TV into more than 175 communities surrounding the Windy City, in what the telco claimed is the largest initial rollout to date for the Internet Protocol TV service.   The launch in northeastern Illinois — where the telco primarily will challenge Comcast — is the largest for U-verse in terms of how widely the service is available on Day One, AT&T spokeswoman Jenny Parker said, without providing specific numbers.

AT&T last week announced it had racked up 231,000 U-verse TV subscribers at the end of 2007, up 83% from 126,000 three months earlier, and claimed it’s on track to reach 1 million subscribers by the close of this year.  U-verse services are available in parts of more than 175 Chicago-area communities, including Bellwood, Buffalo Grove, Crystal Lake, Dolton, Elmhurst, Harvey, Hoffman Estates, Melrose Park, Oak Lawn, Orland Park, River Grove, St. Charles and Waukegan.   —>
http://www.multichannel.com/article/CA6526176.html?desc=topstory
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Media consolidation concerns Adelstein
by Faith Bremner
Sioux Falls Argus Leader
01/28/08

WASHINGTON – Being a member of the Federal Communications Commission is a high-tech, high-stress job, but Jonathan Adelstein seems to thrive on it.  President Bush last month nominated the 45-year-old South Dakota native for a second five-year term to help lead the agency that regulates radio, television, wire, satellite and cable. The Senate is expected to approve his nomination. Before joining the FCC, Adelstein was a senior legislative aide to former Sen. Tom Daschle, D-S.D.

Adelstein, one of two Democrats on the five-member commission, has publicly clashed with his Republican counterparts, most recently over a December decision to allow large media companies to own television stations and newspapers in the top 20 media markets.  Adelstein spoke recently about some of the big issues that have gone before the FCC.   —>
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080128/NEWS/801280301/1001
~

Youth radio earns its full street cred
by Sally Jones
Worcester News (UK)
01/28/08

An internet radio station for young people in Worcestershire has begun broadcasting on FM after being awarded a community radio licence.  Youthcomm Radio, Worcester’s first and only youth community radio station, was established several years ago by Worcestershire County Council’s youth support service.  Since then, it has only been able to broadcast over the internet, but now anyone with a radio will be able to tune in to listen at 106.7FM.

Youthcomm radio co-ordinator Chris Fox said: “The station is a unique opportunity for Worcestershire’s young people to get involved in radio and media.  “They can be involved in producing and presenting the station’s content both on air and behind the scenes.”

The county council’s youth support staff, who help the youngsters to prepare and present the station’s programmes, are working in partnership with Youth Community Media, and Worcester College of Technology and the University of Worcester.   —>
http://www.worcesternews.co.uk/display.var.1999780.0.youth_radio_earns_its_full_street_cred.php
~

“Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing Symposium”
Conference on Online Deliberation (DIAC-2008/OD2008)
Sponsored by Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility and UC Berkeley School of Information
June 26 – 29, 2008
Tools of Participation (CA)
01/27/08

At the dawn of the 21st century humankind faces challenges of profound proportions. The ability of people around the world to discuss, work, make decisions, and take action collaboratively is one of the most important capabilities for addressing these challenges.

Researchers, scholars, activists, advocates, artists, educators, technologists, designers, students, policy-makers, entrepreneurs, journalists and citizens are rising to these challenges in many ways,including, devising new communication technologies that build on the opportunities afforded by the Internet and other new (as well as old) media. The interactions between technological and social systems are of special and central importance in this area.

DIAC-08 combines CPSR’s 11th DIAC symposium with the third Conference on Online Deliberation. The joint conference is intended to provide a platform and a forum for highlighting socio-technological opportunities, challenges, and pitfalls in the area of community and civic action. Technology enhanced community action ranges from informal communities of practice to democratic governance of formal organizations to large
social movements.   —>
http://penplusbytes.blogspot.com/2008/01/directions-and-implications-of-advanced.html
~

National League of Cities Television Partners with BIA Information Network to Offer ActiveAccess Desktop Application to Its Members
Business Wire
Ad-hoc-news.de
01/28/08

BIA Information Network, a leading provider of private-label desktop applications, announced today that it has partnered with the National League of Cities Television (NLC TV) to support efforts to inform its 19,000 members in real-time about events, news alerts, and updated video content on best practices in city management.

‘As a service to our members we wanted to identify a method that would provide them valuable information and updates on our web content in an efficient manner,’ said David Gardy, chairman and CEO of TV Worldwide, producers of NLC TV. ‘With ActiveAccess, NLC TV has found an efficient and proven method of keeping them abreast of what’s happening in city government by using a cutting-edge technology that everyone can easily access and use.’

Through the NLC TV website members from municipalities across the country can download the free ActiveAccess desktop application, a light-weight, non-intrusive program. Once installed users will be alerted automatically when new content is posted, or they can access events, materials, and webcasts directly through the application. For example, videos can be accessed and viewed through the computer desktop without having to open or activate a web browser, making it much easier for members to access desired content.

Because NLC TV can continuously change the content on the ActiveAccess-driven portal page with important information for its members, Gardy sees the new tool as a competitive advantage for NLC TV to create a community within the nation’s cities.   —>
http://www.ad-hoc-news.de/Aktie/12717381/News/15209585/ADVA.html
~

Kaltura and Intelligent Television Partner to Enhance Cultural and Educational Projects With Rich-Media Collaboration
Marketwire.com
01/28/08

Kaltura, Inc., a pioneer in Collaborative Media, and Intelligent Television, a new nonfiction media company, announced today that the organizations will work together on several joint experiments revolving around culture and education using rich-media in the community.

“Intelligent Television is all about educational productions, public media, and community projects, so Kaltura’s concept of group collaboration in rich-media fits our business philosophy like a glove,” said Peter B. Kaufman from Intelligent Television. “Featuring the Kaltura platform in our new productions and in our research projects with moving image archives is very exciting.”

The companies invite the community to join and contribute time, skills and ideas, as well as suggestions of relevant projects.  “It’s great to work with Intelligent Television, a producer with the same values and visions of community and joint creation as Kaltura,” said Ron Yekutiel, Chairman and CEO of Kaltura. “This relationship is an important addition to the Kaltura Global Network, en route of making Kaltura the standard of online rich-media editing and collaboration.”

Kaltura and Intelligent Television will work on a variety of joint projects including a new documentary history of the Korean War with Jigsaw Productions and Intelligent Television’s multiyear Memory Project.  “The Longest Winter” tells the story of America in the Korean War based on the book “The Longest Winter” from Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Halberstam. “The Longest Winter” film is centered on eyewitness accounts and archival media, including rare color film shot during the conflict. Producers Intelligent Television and Jigsaw Productions combine traditional narration, contemporary voices from soldiers and others caught in the events, interviews with veterans, and Halberstam’s words and voice to bring a new sensory experience to the telling of wartime history — and a fresh sense of relevance for the television viewer of today. Using Kaltura’s platform, the archive of material from the film and many of the interviews that are being conducted will be made available to the public to annotate and mix online — see more at http://www.kaltura.com/index.php/browse?kshow_id=99428.   —>
http://www.marketwire.com/mw/release.do?id=814836
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org