Archive for the ‘video contest’ category

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 05/03/08

May 4, 2008

Sirius/XM Merger an Opportunity for Openness & Access? LPFM for Satellite?
by Paul Riismandel
mediageek
05/03/08

[ comments invited ]

Matthew Lasar continues his excellent reporting for Ars Technica with an article on a recent letter from House Energy and Commerce Chair John Dingell (D-MI) and Internet subcommittee Chair Edward J. Markey (D-MA) to the FCC urging an open platform for satellite radio if the Commission approves the Sirius/XM deal. What they’re calling for is the ability for any manufacturer to make Sirius/XM compatible satellite radios, without the ability for the merged company to prevent things like iPod docks or HD Radio capability.

Lasar also notes the gathering steam in support for setting aside some of the merged company’s channel capacity for noncommercial programming, similar to what has been required for direct-broadcast satellite TV. Apparently even Clear Channel wants 5% of capacity set aside for “public interest” programming, whatever Cheap Channel means by that.

I oppose the merger on the principled basis of the fact that such a merger was specifically prohibited as a provision of the original authorization of the service. Nevertheless, I recognize that principle rarely rules the day in DC. Therefore I very much support setting aside channel capacity for non-commercial broadcasters as a necessary condition if the FCC chooses to approve the merger.

Obtaining a non-commercial channel on Dish Network was vitally important for Free Speech TV and has allowed that organization to distribute its radically critical grassroots programming in a way that it simply could not before, feeding public access TV stations around the country.

Although internet distribution is still more practical for radio programming than for TV programming, having several nation-wide progressive and grassroots radio channels nonetheless would be a great opportunity, and could be of great service to community radio stations.   —>
http://www.mediageek.net/?p=1619
~

SPARKY VIDEO CONTEST
by Roger Green
Friends of the Albany Public Library
05/03/08

[ comments invited ]

Competition showcases student productions, offers instructors a fun and thought-provoking class assignment

Six library, student, and advocacy organizations today announced the Second Annual Sparky Awards, a contest that recognizes the best new short videos on the value of sharing and aims to broaden the discussion of access to scholarly research by inviting students to express their views creatively.

This year’s contest is being organized by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) with additional co-sponsorship by the Association of College and Research Libraries, the Association of Research Libraries, Penn Libraries (at the University of Pennsylvania), Students for Free Culture, and The Student PIRGs. Details are online at www.sparkyawards.org.

The 2008 contest theme is “MindMashup: The Value of Information Sharing.” Well-suited for adoption as a college class assignment, the Sparky Awards invite contestants to submit videos of two minutes or less that imaginatively portray the benefits of the open, legal exchange of information. Mashup is an expression referring to a song, video, Web site, or software application that combines content from more than one source.   —>
http://aplfriends.blogspot.com/2008/05/sparky-video-contest.html
~

East Metro candidates to appear at forum May 8
by Gosia Wozniacka
The Oregonian
05/02/08

[ comments invited ]

County commission and state legislative candidates will appear at a voters’ forum next week in Fairview.The Spring Voters Forum will be held Thursday, May 8, at 6:30 p.m. in the Fairview City Council chambers, 1300 NE Village Street. The forum will also be televised live on MetroEast Community Media.   —>
http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2008/05/east_metro_candidates_to_appea.html
~

Community Media 2.0: It’s Still About Us and Our Physical Communities
by Colin Rhinesmith
Community Media in Transition (MA)
05/02/08

[ comments invited ]

My co-workers and I had a meeting today to discuss plans for our new website. Two important things caught my attention in thinking about how to frame the work we’re doing through our visual and semantic design.

First, visual design. The thing that sets us (community media centers) apart in a REALLY important way from social network websites (e.g., Facebook, MySpace, etc.) is our focus on the physical communities we serve. We need to represent that both in our stories and in our visual images online.

For example, the picture above from the staff page on the DCTV website shows the visitor that there are people involved at DCTV in a physical community. So, if you’re a worker at a community media center with a presence online show pictures of your access center and the people from your community. It not only humanizes the web technology that you’re using, but it also tells the website visitor there is a physical place and people involved that others can come to learn more about, learn from, and participate with.   —>
http://cmediachange.net/blog/2008/05/02/community-media-20-its-still-about-us-and-our-physical-communities/
~

As AT&T legislation wraps up, city may be first to see U-verse
by John Rodgers
Nashville City Paper (TN)
05/02/08

[ 7 comments ]

Nashvillians and residents of neighboring counties will likely have the first crack at AT&T’s television programming later this year now that legislation is close to becoming law, a lawmaker close to the telecom said.  Sen. Bill Ketron (R-Murfreesboro), the Senate sponsor of AT&T’s legislation to start offering television programming, said Davidson County and the “doughnut counties” around Nashville would be the first areas where AT&T will offer its U-verse television services.

“Some people in the state will be able to start using U-verse by Dec. 1,” Ketron said.  In addition, Ketron said AT&T was prepared to invest more than $350 million in Tennessee.  So far, for competitive reasons, AT&T officials have not said where they would be offering U-verse if pending legislation became law.  Ketron’s pronouncement didn’t change that.  “We have not made any formal announcement at this point at all,” said AT&T spokesman Bob Corney on Thursday.   —>
http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/news.php?viewStory=59939
~

House OKS study on WiMax Internet technology
by Gina Smith
The State (SC)
05/02/08

[ 32 comments ]

A fight is looming over whether South Carolina should become the first state to adopt the next generation of broadband communication — and who should have access if it does.  WiMax would allow extremely fast connection to the Internet from anywhere in the state and access to never-before-seen interactive tools.  House lawmakers voted Thursday to appoint a panel of seven tech experts from the private sector to study the options and make recommendations to the State Budget and Control Board.   —>
http://www.thestate.com/local/story/392973.html
~

Citywide Wireless IP Network Launched in New York
by Matt Williams
Government Technology
04/15/08

[ 1 comment ]

Leave it to America’s biggest city to launch an equally big high-speed data network.

The New York City Wireless Network (NYCWiN) was rolled out to 70 percent of the city’s police precincts and firehouses on April 1, giving the city’s first responders and employees a unique public safety and public service network.

“It’s the first network of its scope certainly anywhere in the country in terms of the amount of area we’re covering,” said Nick Sbordone, spokesman for the city’s Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT), referring to New York City’s 322 square miles. “The network is solely dedicated to city use, specifically not just for public safety, but for public service as well. It really is historic in that sense.”

NYCWiN will run on 400 nodes across five boroughs — with many of the access points perched on rooftops. New York City CIO Paul Cosgrave, in testimony to the City Council in February, said NYCWiN can support a diverse array of functions:

* Nineteen city agencies developed about 53 unique applications for the network, including an expansion of automated vehicle location, a real-time technology to track the city’s fleet.
* The New York City Department of Environmental Protection is developing an automated water-meter-reading program.
* The city Department of Transportation will use the wireless network to synchronize and time traffic signals to ease traffic congestion. Cosgrave testified that NYCWiN also will provide photos and video of traffic incidents and emergencies.

In addition, the wireless network will be a powerful tool for law enforcement and public safety personnel. The NYPD Real Time Crime Center will link into NYCWiN, which will support Internet protocol (IP)-based emergency call boxes and surveillance cameras. Police officers will have access to in-car photos and video.   —>
http://www.govtech.com/gt/articles/286778
~

News from the profit centres
Press freedom: Many fear the internet is killing journalism, but markets may be a more serious threat
by Geraint Talfan Davies
The Guardian (UK)
05/03/08

[ 14 comments ]

Is new media killing journalism?

The first question to ask is whether this is the right question. The new media need kill nothing. The question is how we choose to use the web. How do we respond to its strengths and to some of its weaknesses?

What I do know is that a luddite approach to the web would be plain ludicrous, even for those of us who still prefer to settle down with a newspaper than flash around the screen.

Instead of bemoaning the web, let’s seek a more positive response. It is possible that the advent of the new media may shake journalism out of a self-deprecating complacency that insists on it being a trade rather than a profession. Journalism will need to better establish its worth in the face of free, unchecked, unverified “user-generated material”. Similarly, the new media might have a beneficial effect on the Press Complaints Commission which, if it is to safeguard self-regulation – a valuable concept in a professional world – will have to do so with greater rigour and transparency in its operation and governance.

It is no accident that an organisation such as the Media Standards Trust has come into being at just this time to address constructively some of the consequences of these developments.

But there are more important questions buried in Unesco’s briefing paper, Freedom of Expression, Access and Empowerment, which says that the role of open and pluralistic media in holding a mirror to society “has fallen increasingly to the smaller community media sector as financial imperatives drive corporate media away from these core principles and into profit centres that do not cater to smaller or marginalised populations.”   —>
http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/geraint_talfan_davies/2008/05/news_from_the_profit_centres.html
~

Civic Engagement, Empowerment & Respect for Diversity (CEERD)
The World Bank
05/02/08 [?]

The Program to Develop New Bank Practices in Civic Engagement, Empowerment and Respect for Diversity (CEERD) is a coalition effort involving all of the World Bank’s technical networks and regions, for which the secretariat resides in the World Bank Institute (WBI). The effort is currently focused on the Voice and Media Technical Assistance Program, which provides expert analyses and how-to advice, carried out in close collaboration with country assistance teams, to improve the enabling environment for pluralistic broadcasting in the public interest, and develop community radio prototyping and sector investment.

In the past the CEERD Program has also supported promoting respect for diversity through education, traditional knowledge and empowerment for poor producers; legal empowerment of the poor; and value-based participatory planning.

The Program currently supports analyses of the broadcasting sectors, particularly the enabling environment for community radio, in several countries, including Ghana, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, and Liberia.  Well experienced teams, including international, regional, and national experts advise during stakeholder deliberations on proposed reforms, assist in development of new broadcasting legislation, provide “how-to” guidance to improve regulatory procedures in order to distinguish between non-profit community broadcasters and commercial ones, and design community radio sector investment programs in close collaboration with national stakeholder coalitions for community radio development.  South-south mentoring and communities of practice support participatory development of community radio stations, as well as capacity development in programming, reporting, and management/resource mobilization.

An important thrust of this agenda is to help build sustained policies, practices and institutions that are megaphones for citizen’s voice and demand for good governance. Community radio development is being given special attention because it has proved to be a sustainable and interactive medium for poor and illiterate populations to articulate issues important to them, mobilize information, learn the give and take of informed discussion and debate, and become more decisive agents in their own development.  These non-profit, non-partisan stations are owned and operated by the communities they serve, and perform an important public service for poor constituencies, eliciting their views and concerns, and encouraging them to speak out, both among themselves and to local government.
http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/WBI/EXTCEERD/0,,menuPK:542912~pagePK:64168427~piPK:64168435~theSitePK:542906,00.html
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 04/18/08

April 20, 2008

“Vehemently Opposed” To AT&T’s Law
Lafayette Pro Fiber (LA)
04/18/08

[ 4 comments ]

As you were warned on these pages AT&T’s state-wide video franchise bill is back again. The title: “Consumer Choice Television Act” is as deceptive a label as the infamous “Fair Competition Act” that the same corporate players used to attempt to kill competition from LUS when the network was little more than an idea. The idea that any law that the state legislature could pass would change the fundamental economic situation so much that AT&T would change its investment plan for rural Louisiana as consequence is a dumber idea than most that come out of the capital building.

The Louisiana Municipal Association (LMA) has come out as “vehemently opposed” to the proposed law. (They’ve issued a dramatic alert to their members calling for local officials to talk with their senators in advance of the Senate Hearing on the 23rd.)  They are right to do so.  It is an astonishingly bad idea.   —>
http://lafayetteprofiber.com/Blog/2008/04/vehemently-opposed-to-at-law.html
~

What’s in it for the consumer?
Commercial Appeal (TN)
04/18/08

[ 4 comments ]

The key question about a bill to spur competition among cable TV providers is whether customers will actually benefit.

When businesses compete, consumers generally win: Better products, better prices, better service.  Let’s hope that proves to be the case with the cable television industry, where telecommunications giant AT&T appears poised to enter the Tennessee market.

State lawmakers are considering a revised version of the “Competitive Cable and Video Service Act,” a piece of legislation that AT&T says it needs to level the playing field with the state’s existing cable TV providers.  The bill pending before the Tennessee General Assembly is a compromise forged after months of complex negotiations involving AT&T, cable companies, the Tennessee Municipal League and legislators.  While the parties involved in those negotiations say the bill is acceptable to them, the real question is whether the legislation will truly benefit the state’s cable TV users.    —>
http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2008/apr/18/editorials-whats-in-it-for-the-consumer/
~

Changing TV Landscape Complicates Cable Franchise License Renewal
by Tim Wood
Cape Cod Chronicle (MA)
04/18/08

CHATHAM — Officials have begun preparations for the long and often complex process of negotiating renewal of its cable television franchise license with Comcast.  The current agreement is set to expire Nov. 29, 2009.  While the chief issues regulators will face in negotiating a new 10-year license have yet to emerge, it is clear that the television landscape is much different today than it was when the previous agreement was signed in 1999.  What technology will bring in the next decade is an even greater unknown.

“My question is, what’s going to happen to television in 10 years?” said William McClellan, one of two members remaining on the town’s cable advisory committee.  “It’s going to be completely different.  “Things have changed in the last 10 years,” agreed Jennifer Petit, the town’s finance director, who is taking a leading role in the process.  She’s met with McClellan and fellow cable committee member Robert Bourke to review a community survey, which will be done via telephone by UMass Dartmouth in the next few months, to ascertain how residents feel about current cable television services and what changes they would like to see.  Meetings will probably be held to get further public input, she added.   —>
http://www.capecodchronicle.com/chatnews/chat041708_5.htm
~

Indybay joins Media Alliance for an Evening in Berkeley
Indybay.org (CA)
04/15/08

On Thursday April 24th, Indybay will participate in a panel discussion, sponsored by Media Alliance, about building community in the practice of independent media. The program will be held at the Unitarian Universalist Church at the corner of Cedar and Bonita in in Berkeley, at 7:00 p.m.

On the panel with Indybay will be Silicon Valley Debug, Berkeley Community Media and First Voice, the apprenticeship program at KPFA. The program is an effort on the part of Indybay and Media Alliance to promote independent media in the Bay Area. The panelists from Indybay will be Peter Maiden, who is photo coordinator, and Zachary Ogren, a photographer, an editor and the author of much of Indybay’s software. In brief presentations Peter and Zachary will explain the structure of the Indybay site and Indybay as an organization, and relate some of the high points of Indybay’s history.

There will be an opportunity for anyone interested in working with Indybay, from posting to the site to becoming an editor, to connect with the collective. Silicon Valley Debug is a cutting-edge group that relates the reality of working and living on the margin in the South Bay, functioning as both a magazine and a website. Berkeley Community Media is community television at its best. The First Voice apprenticeship program brings women and minorities the skills necessary for professional radio and is one of the underpinnings of KPFA.
http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2008/04/15/18493055.php
~

Former student media activist combines music, social justice
Texas Media Empowerment Project serves as watchdog.
by Stephanie Mikneus
The Ranger (TX)
04/17/908

[ comments invited ]

DeAnne Cuellar, a former student at this college, is one of the founders of the Texas Media Empowerment Project.  The nonprofit organization was created as an advocate for social justice and to provide support to organizations using all aspects of music, media and technology, according to its Web site at http://www.texasmep.org.  Texas Media Empowerment Project is a media activist organization working to build partnerships, supporters and progressive victories in the media industry.   —>
http://media.www.theranger.org/media/storage/paper1010/news/2008/04/18/Premiere/Former.Student.Media.Activist.Combines.Music.Social.Justice-3333223.shtml
~

Please stand by
by Karen Bazzarri
Times-Tribune (PA)
04/18/08

Editor: In a recent Your Opinion, a viewer noted technical problems with Channels 61/62 cablecasts — specifically poor sound quality, as well as occasionally cutting off public meetings before they have concluded.  Recently a member of City Council leveled similar criticisms. My reply is “Guilty as charged.”

You see, the volunteers operating Ch. 61/62 are not television professionals. Far from it. They are just dedicated citizens who believe strongly in democracy and the public’s right to know. They give their time without compensation, but with great conviction. And yes, on occasion they do make mistakes.  For the past 10 years Scranton Today has employed a business model that stressed content over craft and always aimed to provide this public service in the most economical way possible. Recently, the city of Scranton chose to award the operation of Ch. 61/62 to a new group with a very different approach.

The new operators, a group known as Electric City TV, have requested startup funding from the city in excess of $300,000 to cover equipment, salaries, building renovation and maintenance.  According to ECTV’s proposal (see www.scrantontoday.org), operating funds in the following four years would total an additional $597,000 from the city. While I do believe that public access television can be a worthy investment for any city, the wisdom of this magnitude of funding at this point in our city’s history is a subject for each citizen to decide. I can say this, though: Had Scranton Today received even a fraction of these operating funds, “technical glitches” would have been rare events indeed.   —>
http://www.thetimes-tribune.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=19496268&BRD=2185&PAG=461&dept_id=418216&rfi=6
~

Graduation Help
Current Eevents in Community Access (KS)
04/18/08

[ comments invited ]

As a friendly reminder: Brown Mackie’s Graduation Commencement is coming up on April 26th. Crew call is at 2:30, and it is located at the Bicentennial Center.  We still need about 5 volunteers to help out with the shoot, so anyone can assist in the production, please let Marnie know as soon as possible.   —>
http://communityaccesstelevision.blogspot.com/2008/04/graduation-help.html
~

Access Auction!
Current Events in Community Access (KS)
04/18/08

[ comments invited ]

It is time for the monthly Access Auction! Support Community Access Television by bidding in this month’s auction. Choose from a family meal in Lindsborg, a portrait setting, and even a hand crocheted baby afghan. A complete list is available online at http://www.salinatv.org or by calling 823-2500. Place your bid today and get great gift ideas in return.   This auction will run for 7 days and bids may be submitted by email or phone.   —>
http://communityaccesstelevision.blogspot.com/2008/04/access-auction.html
~

Video contest returns after hiatus
by Hoyt Elkins
The Union Democrat (CA)
04/18/08

Calaveras County Public Access Television is reviving its Best Video Contest after a five-year hiatus, and finds that the winners of the last competition are now making a feature-length western.  A short, quirky, sci-fi-horror video conceived, produced and directed by a Valley Springs brother and sister team won the previous competition.  “I’ve been distracted by other projects for the past few years,” said Ed Lark, manager of the Public Access Television Studio in San Andreas, “but I decided to get busy and revive the contest.”   —>
http://www.uniondemocrat.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=26360
~

Media Access Guide For Non-Profit Organizations
KRON 4 (CA)
04/18/08 [?]

Want to learn about the free public service time available for your volunteer organization or non-profit group? If your answer is yes, read on, because this was written for you.KRON 4 regularly provides air time to non-profit community groups as do most other television and radio stations. The competition for time is fierce, so a good presentation is essential.In this access guide you’ll find tips on how to organize publicity campaigns as well as information on how to write and format a public service announcement (PSA) and press release. You’ll also find a list of helpful organizations for the media mavens among you, including an index of Bay Area television and radio stations.Doing your homework is the best way to ensure your announcement will be aired. That means knowing your audience, paying attention to station formats and writing the best possible announcement. So sharpen your pencils, put a new ribbon in the typewriter or boot up your computer. You’re going on the air!   —>
http://www.kron4.com/Global/story.asp?S=510446&nav=menu130_9_3_1
~

Community Media – April 20
Daily Camera (CO)
04/18/08 [?]

[ 1 comment ]

Following is a list of highlights of programming in Boulder community media over the coming week.   —>
http://dailycamera.com/news/2008/apr/18/no-headline—20pmedw/
~

Nationally aired radio show host will speak in Salida Sunday
by Jonathan Schwab
The Mountain Mail (CO)
04/18/08

Amy Goodman, host of the national award-winning radio and television news program, “Democracy Now! The War and Peace Report,” will visit Salida Sunday with her brother, David.  Their visit is in support of independent, community media such as event sponsor KHEN Radio.  “The idea of these precious public spaces, whether they’re small or large, is to have a power for local voices,” Amy said. “Even the smallest issue has global implications.”  It’s this concept that defines true democracy, she said.   —>
http://www.themountainmail.com/main.asp?SectionID=4&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=13528&TM=42487.95
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 03/04/08

March 9, 2008

Durham to pay for public access TV
A city-county pact with Time Warner Cable sets a price of $120,000 for 10 months’ programs
by Samiha Khanna
The News & Observer (NC)
03/04/08

City and county leaders agreed Monday to pay Time Warner Cable $120,000 over the next 10 months to air public access programs — shows that used to be aired for free.  The city-county agreement came after more than a year of negotiation between the governments and Time Warner, and it will ensure that city and county government programming continues on cable Channel 8, which they share, and the schools continue to broadcast on cable Channel 4.

But the agreement doesn’t address all local officials’ grievances. Durham County officials have also filed a lawsuit seeking an additional channel, which they say they are entitled to for free under the law.  Both the issue of paying for public access, and the number of channels local governments can use for free, stem from recent changes to cable franchise laws.  In 2006, the legislature shifted cable franchising authority from local governments to the state government.  The transfer in responsibility has changed some of the services Time Warner is obligated to provide to governments, said Deputy City Manager Ted Voorhees.

Under a former local agreement with the city of Durham, Time Warner employees used to produce and air public access TV for free, Voorhees said.  Now that Time Warner’s franchise is granted by the state, the company doesn’t have to meet the requirements of individual contracts with cities and counties, Voorhees said.  Under the statewide franchise, Durham citizens will no longer be able to visit the cable company’s local studios on East Club Boulevard to learn how to operate cameras and edit tape.  Local shows must now be produced independently and submitted to Time Warner to be reviewed, scheduled and aired.

The shift from local to state control has threatened to disrupt a Sunday morning tradition in Durham. For 17 years, a legion of church folk have tuned in to Channel 8 to watch sermons and other inspirational programming, said the Rev. James E. Vaughan, pastor at Abundant Life Assembly Church. For the ill or disabled, televised services, which also appear some mornings and evenings during the week, are a must.  “It’s not just getting your congregation on,” Vaughan said. “Shut-ins get to follow along services with their local congregation so they can continue to feel a part of it. It’s kind of a big deal to them.”   —>
http://www.newsobserver.com/news/story/980210.html
~

Lansing must fix threat to public access
The Times Herald (MI)
03/04/08

[ 3 comments ]

Flawed cable law paved way for transfer of community programs

No matter how Comcast tries to spin it, the cable provider’s efforts to move some of its channels to a higher digital tier runs counter to the interests of many viewers. More important, state lawmakers bear responsibility for making it easier for Comcast to change its programming.  Adopted in December 2006, Michigan’s “Uniform Video Services Local Franchise Act” was supposed to promote greater competition within the state’s cable TV industry. Instead, the new law relaxed cable providers’ commitment to public service programming  Lansing must correct that error.   —>
http://www.thetimesherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080304/OPINION01/803040327/1014/OPINION
~

Cable providers in Wisconsin seek statewide franchises
The Business Journal of Milwaukee
03/04/08

Five Wisconsin cable and video service providers – Charter Communications Inc., Time Warner Cable, AT&T Inc., CenturyTel and Comcast Cable – have applied for statewide video franchises under legislation passed last year.  AT&T received approval for its franchise from the Wisconsin Department of Financial Institutions last week, the nonprofit consumer advocate group TV4US Wisconsin said Tuesday.   —>
http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/stories/2008/03/03/daily24.html
~

Community Media Strategy Session 3/15
by Gordon Smith
Blog Asheville (NC)
03/04/08

[ 2 comments ]

Asheville area Community Media mavens are gathering again. Our February strategy session produced some excellent ideas, one of which I’ll ask for suggestions about in a couple of paragraphs.  First thing first though. Our next Community Media Strategy Session will take place March 15, 4:30pm – 6:15pm at URTV studios. James Wilson of Talk Asheville will present ideas for our Community Media Wiki at that time. I’ll also put out a rough agenda in a few days and ask for everyone’s input.

If you aren’t on the Community Media email list (which is different from the BlogAsheville mailing list!), just shoot me a message at scrutinyhooligans AT yahoo SPOT cOm. Then I can keep you updated as things happen.  If you haven’t taken the Priorities Survey, take a minute and do that now.

Cross promoting our various media was at the top of folks’ priorities at the last session, and it’s been good to see that a lot of people have been busily linking readers, listeners, and viewers to other media orbits. If you haven’t yet taken the time to shout out to your favorite bloggers, radio hosts, artists, and television personalities, do it today. By pointing Community Media consumers to more of the same, we’ll all become stronger.  Here’s the part where I ask for comments and suggestions:

The last strategy session produced the idea of doing a Media Swarm on a topic, issue, or area. A Media Swarm is intended to draw attention to a specific topic via our various media. It also serves the purpose of making folks more aware of Community Media. There will be ideological agenda involved in choosing the topic. It’ll be up to each person to decide how to address the topic. The inaugural Media Swarm is going to take place this month, and it’s time to decide what we’ll swarm around. Here are the ideas suggested so far in the Priorities Survey:   —>
http://blogasheville.blogspot.com/2008/03/community-media-strategy-session-315.html
~

Cable contract is for five years
City and Charter agree to terms
by Nick Kotsopoulos
Worcester Telegram & Gazette (MA)
03/04/08

Breaking from past practice, the city has negotiated a shorter-term license renewal with Charter Communications for the local cable television franchise.  City Manager Michael V. O’Brien said last night the term of the new deal is five years instead of 10. He contends a shorter-term contract is in the city’s best interest because technology, competition and regulations for the cable industry continue to evolve so rapidly.

He pointed out that competitors such as Verizon have expanded their presence in the cable industry during the past couple of years. He believes Verizon, and other companies, will eventually focus their attention on Worcester.  “The very fact that the city will facilitate the construction of a 20-mile fiber loop, complete with wireless towers, over the next two years will provide for new and exciting options for competition,” Mr. O’Brien said. “It is for these reasons that I believe a shorter term sets the stage for competition, above all else, to improve the range of services and price options for our citizens.”

Charter’s previous 10-year contract with the city expired in January 2007. It was extended six months to July 7, and when city officials failed to complete a new contract before that date, it was extended another six months.  Traditionally, the city has had 10-year contracts with cable franchise holders. But city councilors have urged the city manager to limit the length of this license renewal to no more than five years because of the rapid, ongoing changes in cable technology and competition.  The terms of the new cable contract are as follows:   —>
http://www.telegram.com/article/20080304/NEWS/803040677/1008/NEWS02
~

Port’s new TV studio set for May debut
Newburyport News (MA)
03/04/08

The Newburyport Community Media Center, which will broadcast both Comcast Channel 9 and Channel 10 from its location at 3 Graf Road in Newburyport, is nearing completion and will open to the public in early May.  The Community Media Center, which will also provide programming for the Newburyport schools and the city, is a nonprofit organization formed in 2006. The public will be invited to visit and explore the new facility during open houses planned for May.   —>
http://www.wickedlocal.com/newburyport/news/x1092579736
~

ICTV wins five (count ’em, FIVE) PEGASYS awards for excellence!
by Dianne
All Things Park (NY)
03/04/08

This just in from Peter Johanns, ICTV’s adviser:

ICTV received a total of 5 awards at this years PEGASYS awards for Cablecasting Excellence for the Public Access and Educational Access channels on Time Warner Cable in Tompkins county. Held on February 29, 2008, ICTV was nominated in 7 of the 10 categories.  ICTV received first place awards for B.S. Detectives in the Comedy/Variety category; NewsWatch 16 for the Public Affairs category; and The Race 2 for the Documentary category.

Additionally, The Race 2 and Bombers Football received the highest scores for educational access programming and will be submitted to the Hometown Video Festival, a national competition organized by the Alliance for Community Media held in Washington D.C this July.  (The Race 2 was the highest scoring program among all entrants in this year’s PEGASYS Awards.)

Congratulations to all of the ICTV students who worked hard and contributed to attain this recognition and achievement!  Ditto from the dean: CONGRATULAIONS to you all!
http://allthingspark.blogspot.com/2008/03/ictv-wins-five-count-em-five-pegasys.html
~

Community radio in India set to go global
by Piya Kochhar
OneWorld South Asia
03/04/08

[ comments allowed ]

Steve Buckley is excited by the scope of CR in India and has plenty of wisdom to share from his 25-year love affair with radio that he began in Cambridge, as a pirate broadcaster. Piya Kochhar, co-founder of News Radio India, speaks to him.

Piya Kochhar: Why radio? What draws you to this?

Steve Buckley: Radio is an extraordinarily accessible medium. It’s a medium that’s immediate, easy to use, and low-cost. What I discovered during my pirate broadcasting days, was that it was not so difficult to actually become a radio broadcaster. I mean we didn’t really pay any money to start our radio station. We just cobbled together a few easily accessible bits of electronics, built a transmitter, and went on the air.  So I realised that broadcasting didn’t have to be medium of the elite. It didn’t have to be something inaccessible.  We could actually take control of this media; we could appropriate it for community use. And that’s what really inspired me and continues to do so every time I visit a local community radio project. I see people doing extraordinarily inspiring things.   —>
http://southasia.oneworld.net/article/view/158476/1/5339
~

TV from the Future
Former Hartford Public Access Television maven J. Stan McCauley has launched what he claims is the world’s first broadband television network
by Daniel D’Ambrosio
Hartford Advocate (CT)
03/04/08

[ comments allowed ]

J. Stan McCauley, the former executive director of Hartford Public Access Television and a candidate for mayor in last fall’s election until he was swept away by the Eddie Perez tidal wave, has launched his own television network on the Internet, which he says is a first.  Technically it’s called hypermedia portal alternative television, but you can just call it hpatv5.com, McCauley’s online address. (Have a look.)

McCauley says he had a flash of inspiration for the network soon after he joined the ranks of the unemployed in early December, after more than 20 years at Hartford Public Access Television. The inspiration came while sitting at a traffic light with a friend who was driving the car.  “I thought to myself, ‘What am I good at? I’m good at building small television stations from the ground up,'” McCauley said. “It just hit me all at once, why not do local origination programming and give it a worldwide footprint on the Web.”   —>
http://www.hartfordadvocate.com/article.cfm?aid=6298
~

IFJ Calls for United Nations “Urgent Action” Over Deadly Media Crisis in Iraq
Media for Freedom
03/04/08

The International Federation of journalists today called on the Secretary General of the United Nations to lead new efforts by the international community in defence of journalists and media in Iraq following the death last week of Shihab Al-Timimi, the President of the Iraqi Union of Journalists.

In a letter to UN chief Bang Ki-moon, the IFJ President and General Secretary say that the United Nations must raise its voice to protect journalists and media in Iraq and to encourage more effective action by the government of Iraq and those UN states who have pledged to bring about peace and reconciliation in the country.  “A timely statement of support from the United Nations for Iraqi journalism will show that the international community stands alongside the community of journalists in these dark days,” says the IFJ.

The IFJ, which has also written to Iraqi Prime Minister Al-Maliki, says the UN must support the Iraqi Union of Journalists (IUJ) and their campaign for safety, it must do more to put pressure on governments to defend independent media and it must reinforce efforts through the groundbreaking Security Council Resolution 1738 on journalists’ safety to find and prosecute those who are targeting and killing media workers.   —>
http://www.mediaforfreedom.com/ReadArticle.asp?ArticleID=9916
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 01/23/08

January 24, 2008

Community Video Units are making a strong impact in India
by media for freedom
01/23/08

Based in New York and Ahmedabad, India, Video Volunteers and their partners have developed a community media initiative in India that is using video to empower communities to take action around critical issues relevant to development.  In the last 16 months they have produced 45 video magazines reaching 130,000 people living in 200 slums and villages.  What is a Community Video Unit?   —>
http://www.mediaforfreedom.com/ReadArticle.asp?ArticleID=9149
~

Working group focuses on communications policy for new administration
Penn State Live (PA)
01/22/08

While the presidential election moves through its primary stages, a group of Penn State faculty members and colleagues from across the country has its sights set beyond the outcome of the general election in November. They’re not focusing on a specific candidate, either.

Instead, the faculty members anticipate January 2009, the next president’s inauguration and the corresponding change in the federal government as the time to present an outline — as well as the practical steps necessary for implementation — of a new U.S. communications policy.

The Future of American Communications Working Group, supported by a $75,000 grant from the Media Democracy Fund, a project of the Proteus Fund, plans to produce a volume outlining a comprehensive telecommunications policy agenda for the federal administration to be entering office in January 2009. That agenda will emphasize the potential of information technologies for improving democratic discourse, social responsibility and the quality of life. It will specify the means by which those technologies can be made available to all Americans.

“The unique concentration of such a large group of leading communication policy scholars in the College of Communications has made Penn State the natural place to serve as the center for such an ambitious project,” said Amit Schejter, an assistant professor in the Department of Telecommunications and director of the working group.   —>
http://live.psu.edu/story/28221?rss=30
~

Broadband Speeds Need to be Gigabit – Now
Municipal Broadband
by James Carlini
01/23/08

Depending on your current definition of broadband network connectivity, you might want to update your frame of reference.

Did you know at the beginning of 2008 that Japan announced its objective for broadband connectivity is 10 gigabits by 2010? In some recent discussions I have had, some industry pundits think 1 gigabit is too high to achieve.

A couple megabits or even 30 Mbps to 40 Mbps to the premise as a design goal is an obsolete objective unless you are aiming us into a third-rate infrastructure for the future.

I have been saying within my columns for years and at national conferences and regional seminars (like the recent one with SimpleTel in Madison, Wis. featuring Dantel, Connect802 and Matisse Networks) that broadband connectivity today means providing gigabit speeds. Period.

The only people who don’t want to hear this are those tied to products and network services that have sub-gigabit maximums. These people don’t want to hear that what they’re supporting is obsolete and not globally competitive. Why is this such a hard thing for some industry executives and supposed network infrastructure vendors and designers to accept?   —>
http://www.carliniscomments.com/archives/156-BROADBAND-SPEEDS-NEED-TO-BE-GIGABIT-NOW.html#extended
~

Akaku goes to court tomorrow over bidding process
by Larry Geller
Disappeared News (HI)
01/23/08

The Maui News report that Akaku Maui Community Television will go before Judge Joel August tomorrow in its quest to have the public bidding process for Hawaii’s public access television services set aside.  Read the article here.

I was one of hundreds of people who turned out to testify against putting the contracts out to bid. After a two hour 12 minute secret session held without required notice, the Procurement Policy Board voted that the contracts should go out to bid. My request for minutes of that 2006 meeting is still pending at the Office of Information Practices. —>
http://disappearednews.com/2008/01/akaku-goes-to-court-tomorrow-over.html
~

Upgrades expected at TV studio thanks to new contract
by Brian Messenger
Andover Townsman (MA)
01/23/08

A newly formed nonprofit corporation will run Andover’s local television studio for the next five years, after selectmen unanimously approved a contract with Andover Community Access & Media Inc. last month.

Equipment upgrades and better programs will likely be the result of the new pact, according to David Pierre, an Andover resident and president of the nonprofit’s five-member board of overseers.  “We’re going to be able to produce much more sophisticated shows, much more technologically-advanced shows,” said Pierre.

“I think one of the biggest things the viewers will notice is we’ll be able to broadcast all of the town government’s meetings live on the Web,” he said. “Anybody, no matter where they are in the world, will be able to watch town meetings.”   —>
http://www.andovertownsman.com/arts/local_story_023134527.html?keyword=topstory
~

Submission sought for Five Minute Film Festival
Cape Ann Beacon (MA)
01/23/08

CinemaSalem, in cooperation with Film North, is presenting a “Five Minute Festival,” to be held at CinemaSalem on May 1. The festival competition is free and is open to college and high school students living in Essex County.

The rules are simple: make a video of five minutes or less. It can be on any genre – such as animation, music video, documentary, comedy or drama – and it can be on any subject. Projects will be judged on a number of criteria, but what will count the most is how creative the filmmakers are with the tools they have available. Individuals or teams can enter…  For more information and entry forms, e-mail mleibov [at] filmnorth [dot] org and visit www.filmnorth.org.
http://www.wickedlocal.com/essex/fun/entertainment/entertainment_calendar/x1151551938
~

25 Year Anniversary Kick-Off at Annual Meeting
Foxboro Cable Access (MA)
01/23/08

At their 2007 Annual Meeting this Saturday evening, January 26th, Foxboro Cable Access will officially begin its three-year 25th Anniversary Awareness Campaign. The organization was incorporated in 1982 to implement the terms of the town’s first cable television franchise agreement. Other milestones for Training and Studio Dedication quickly followed in the next two years, and since then, as they say, the rest is history.   —>
http://fcatv.org/node/276
~

Volunteers Wanted for Public Access TV in Lower Connecticut River Valley
Free Training Available for Residents in Nine Towns
by Corey Sipe
Associated Content
01/23/08

Residents and teachers in the nine-town region are being asked to step up to the plate and help increase the amount of public, educational, and governmental programming shown on cable television.  Robert Mathis, Chairman of the Comcast Cable Television Advisory Board and Westbrook resident, said the medium provides a great opportunity to connect residents with their town governments, schools, and communities.

In the lower Connecticut River Valley, Comcast provides cable service to the towns of Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Durham, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Old Saybrook, and Westbrook.  From their cable bill, the estimated 23,000 subscribers pay approximately $6.30 a year that goes toward public access…

…Mathis recently attended the Jan. 10 Westbrook Leadership meeting and recommended that more town meetings should be videotaped and broadcast to help convey a positive image for this shoreline town whose image was tarnished after the former First Selectman was arrested twice.  In order to do this, Mathis is encouraging residents to form a group of volunteers that would take free training courses at the public access studio at 21 East Main Street in Clinton.   —>
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/558455/volunteers_wanted_for_public_access.html
~

Mayor Joe to serve second term leading Mass Municipal Association
Somerville Journal (MA)
01/23/08

—>   I am particularly honored to continue serving as president of the MMaA, and to join my colleagues in working on a wide rage of issues, including the restoration of local aid, support for the Governor Patrick’s Municipal Partnership Act, protection of local control of cable franchising and much more.”
http://www.wickedlocal.com/somerville/homepage/x603845190
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org

Community Media: Selected Clippings – 01/18/08

January 20, 2008

Media group calls for release of two Afghan journalists
AFP-Google
01/16/08

KABUL — Reporters Without Borders has called on the Afghan government to release two journalists accused of blasphemy, for which conservative religious clerics have demanded the death penalty.  The international media watchdog said Thursday it was concerned about the fate of the men, arrested separately about two months ago.

Sayed Perwiz Kambakhsh, 23, was picked up in northern Afghanistan in late October on charges of blasphemy and defaming Islam for distributing articles about the role of women in Muslim society, the group said.  Mohammad Ghaws Zalmai, in his 40s, was arrested in November while trying to escape to Pakistan after an uproar about a translation of the Koran that he distributed and was alleged to “misinterpret” parts of the Muslim holy book.   —>
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iiUEgLNDv7K1ZNcZcnVFr9TriKwQ
~

City Sponsored Cable Franchise Hearings… (NYC)
by Arthur (3 comments)
LiveJournal
01/18/08

—>   New York City will be holding five (5) public hearings, one in each Borough, to solicit comments from subscribers regarding the NYC CableTV Franchise Renewal of Time Warner Cable, in Manhattan, Brooklyn,Queens and Staten Island and Cablevision, in the Bronx and Brooklyn.Hearings will take place from 3pm-7pm on the following dates and siteswith informative websites. Written and/or oral comments may bepresented at the hearing or to NYC DoITT by submitting comments here.

Bronx: January 17, 2008
Queens: January 22, 2008
Staten Island: January 24, 2008
Brooklyn: January 31, 2008
Manhattan: February 7, 2008
—>
http://community.livejournal.com/newyorkers/3620627.html
~

Don’t Change the Channel. Change the System.
by Josh Silver (34 comments)
The Huffington Post
01/18/08

Mainstream media — especially television — is like an alcoholic that keeps binging, repenting, swearing sobriety, and returning to the bottle. Problem is, it’s the American public that’s getting poisoned by their lethal stew of horse-race election analysis, celebrity gossip and soundbite coverage. We go to the voting booth — a right that people fought and died for — knowing very little about what the candidates actually stand for. And you can forget about any information on candidates like Dennis Kucinich and Ron Paul, whom the press has shut out of the debate — literally.

While Wolf Blitzer is throwing softballs at another candidate, Bill O’Reilly is blaming every problem on liberals, and your local news anchor is reporting on a car wreck, we are left without a clue about the issues that count. We don’t know if the president’s “surge” in Iraq is actually working. Or if the recent skirmish between U.S. warships and Iranian speedboats is a real incident or a Pentagon PR stunt. And what are the real implications of China’s $1.4 trillion trade surplus that increases by $1 billion every day? Or what important decision was made by your City Council or school board last night?

Before you shake your head and say that TV doesn’t matter in the age of the Internet, consider this: According to a report recently released by the Pew Research Center, local TV stations remain the No. 1 source of presidential election news. Cable TV news is second; network TV news is third. TV continues to completely dominate as the opinion leader in American politics.

But at some point you need to stop throwing your remote at the TV. Going outside and yelling that you’re “fed up and you’re not going to take it anymore” isn’t working, folks. It’s time to understand what’s really wrong with the media and what’s really needed to fix it. One word: profits.  You can dress up a cash cow and make it look like a news operation, but at the end of the day, they’re milking the information lifeline that nurtures our democracy.   —>
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/josh-silver/dont-change-the-channel_b_82208.html
~

Aide’s new job raises no flags for Bredesen
by Bonna Johnson (2 comments)
The Tennessean
01/18/08

Gov. Phil Bredesen said he sees no ethical conflict with his communications director leaving his staff to work for a public affairs firm that represents AT&T, which is engaged in a fierce legislative battle with cable companies.  Bob Corney, who joined the governor’s staff in February 2004, is leaving at the end of the month. He is not permitted to lobby for a year under the state’s ethics law.   —>
http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080118/NEWS0201/801180415
~

Bredesen to cave in on AT&T bill?
by R. Neal (1 comment)
TennViews (TN)
01/18/08

Looks like Bredesen is set to cave in on the AT&T cable franchise bill. Coincidentally, his communications director has just left and gone to work for AT&T’s lobbyist.  Gov. Bredesen cites the need to expand broadband access as the justification. I agree we need expanded broadband access. This is not, however, the way to achieve it.   —>
http://www.tennviews.com/node/461
~

Bredesen weighs getting involved in AT&T vs. cable
by John Rodgers
Nashville City Paper (TN)
01/18/08

Gov. Phil Bredesen said Thursday he is considering getting involved in the fight between AT&T and the cable industry over creating a statewide television franchise.  But Bredesen, who stayed out of the brouhaha between the two parties last year, said he would not be coming down on the side of AT&T or the cable industry.  Instead, Bredesen said if he got involved it would be to explore ways to deploy more broadband Internet access into rural areas, which he says is currently insufficient.  “It’s particularly acute in rural areas of our state, which as you know I’m concerned very much about promoting business in,” Bredesen told reporters Thursday. “So I think the possibility exists. I’m not promising it.”   —>
http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/news.php?viewStory=58575
~

Connect Kentucky Article Raises Bell Lobby Specter
by Drew Clark (1 comment)
DrewClark.com
01/17/08

Art Brodsky’s 4,789-word article about Connect Kentucky and its offspring Connected Nation has been the talk of telecom circles over the past week…

…What Connect Kentucky doesn’t do, or at least doesn’t advertise doing, is measuring competition in the broadband marketplace. Knowing where broadband is available and where it isn’t available is only the first step in our nation’s broadband quotient. Knowing where broadband competition is available, and who the competitors are, is the crucial next step.

Connect Kentucky and Connected Nation don’t speak much, if at all, about this aspect of broadband mapping. In fact, the Durbin and Inouye bills sidestep this challenge completely. Ed Markey’s “Broadband Census of America Act,” by contrast, clearly states that local information about broadband competitors will be made available to the public. It appears that the Connected Nation approach to broadband mapping, as articulated in the Durbin and Inouye bills, doesn’t contemplate public access to or knowledge about the companies that provide broadband within a given area.   —>
http://www.drewclark.com/connect-kentucky-article-raises-bell-lobby-specter/
~

With Comcast Under Fire, Vuze Enjoys Growth Surge
The P2P service claims to have signed up 17 million subscribers since its launch one year ago and says it’s adding 2 million users per month.
by Richard Martin
InformationWeek
01/18/08

While controversy swirls around the struggle between traditional big-pipe entertainment providers to the home — specifically the cable carriers and namely Comcast (NSDQ: CMCSA), the nation’s largest cable TV service — and providers of online peer-to-peer content services, particularly BitTorrent, the market for online movies and other forms of content continues to grow apace.

That growth is benefiting startups like Vuze, the P2P service launched last year by Azureus, one of the biggest BitTorrent client software providers.

Calling itself “the world’s most popular entertainment platform for DVD-quality and HD video content,” Vuze claims to have signed up 17 million subscribers since its launch one year ago and says it’s adding 2 million users per month. Last month the Palo Alto, Calif., company announced a $20 million funding round led by New Enterprise Associates. NEA managing director Mike Ramsay, the co-founder and former CEO of TiVo, joined the Vuze board of directors.

Vuze has become involved in the effort to force Comcast to stop slowing traffic on its network devoted to big file-sharing programs, particularly BitTorrent — which is now thought to account for as much as 50% of all Internet traffic in the United States. On Nov. 14 Vuze filed a petition with the Federal Communications Commission demanding that the commission set rules governing traffic management by large Internet service providers, and that ISPs be forced to publicly reveal their policies toward traffic filtering and “shaping.”   —>
http://www.informationweek.com/internet/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=205901705
~

Show Us Your Reel Brooklyn: A Video Contest for Brooklyn Teens
by The Changeling
Bed-StuyBlog (NY)
01/18/08

I recently received this information about a video contest open to 9-12th graders in Brooklyn. I sounds like an exciting opportunity for a young filmmaker-to-be:

BRIC Arts | Media | Bklyn announces Show Us Your Reel Brooklyn, a borough-wide teen video contest that will launch the new Brooklyn Independent Television show BK 4 Reel. Brooklyn Independent Television is a flagship initiative of Brooklyn Community Access Television (BCAT), a program of BRIC Arts | Media | Bklyn.

Participants in the contest are being asked to send in a 2-3 minute video of Brooklyn from their own unique perspective. The video may be in any genre; however, it must be shot in Brooklyn by a 9th-12th grader who either lives in, or attends high school in, the Borough of Brooklyn…  The contest deadline is February 20, 2008. Official contest entry forms are available at briconline.org/bcat and myspace.com/brooklyntv. Students with specific questions about the contest may write to bk4reel [at] briconline.org.   —>
http://www.bedstuyblog.com/2008/01/18/show-us-your-reel-brooklyn-a-video-contest-for-brooklyn-teens/
~

Katonah-Lewisboro communications plan
District looks to improve communications
by Matt Dalen
Lewisboro Ledger (NY)
01/18/08

—>  On Thursday, Jan. 10, Superintendent of Schools Dr. Robert Roelle presented a draft of the district’s new communications plan to the school board, proposing a widespread strategy to disperse information to residents, through more meetings, the Internet, cable television, the media, and “backpack mail” flyers…

… The full “public information plan,” as presented by Dr. Roelle, would include a part-time (60% of the work week) public information officer and webmaster, as well as a full-time cable television coordinator. Money for the public information officer was included in the 2007-08 school budget, but has not yet been spent.  A cable television coordinator would need to be included in a future budget should the school board agree that such a position is needed.  How much a potential coordinator would be paid was not addressed. Dr. Roelle told The Ledger later that he had looked at coordinators in two school districts, which paid between $65,000 and $75,000, but that the district would need to make a decision when and if the position made it into a budget.

“We don’t think we’re maximizing the use of cable television,” said Dr. Roelle. He mentioned ideas for broadcasting student performances, timely discussions and more athletic events on public access television, which in Lewisboro is Channel 20. While some athletic events are now broadcast on Channel 20, not all of them are, and the only school-based talk show is the student-produced Straight Talk, which is broadcast intermittently.   —>
http://www.acorn-online.com/news/publish/lewisboro/27632.shtml
~

Support Free Speech! Judge August to Decide on Future of Public Access
by Cynthia Thomet
Akaku: Maui Community Television (HI)
01/18/08

Show your support for public access and Akaku on Thursday, Jan. 24 at 8:15 a.m. at the Second Circuit Court in Wailuku. We are asking supporters to dress in black and appear in court as Judge Joel August presides over Akaku’s case against the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) and the State of Hawaii. Through a controversial and unlawful request for proposal (RFP) process that would put PEG access under the influence of state bureaucracies instead of the general public and community organizations, the DCCA and the State of Hawaii have been attempting to take the public out of public access .   —>
http://www.akaku.org/?p=33
~

Canada Begins Curbing Cross-Ownership
Radio World Newspaper
01/18/08

Canada’s communications regulator has instituted a new media ownership policy to maintain “a diversity of voices” in the country’s broadcasting system.  The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has established a new policy restricting cross-ownership. A person or entity will only be permitted to control two of three types of media serving the same market: a local radio or television station or a local newspaper.   —>
http://www.rwonline.com/pages/s.0100/t.10745.html
~

compiled by Rob McCausland
Alliance for Community Media
202-393-2650
web:  http://ourchannels.org
wiki:  http://peg.ourchannels.org